The United States Magazine and Democratic Review, Volume 8 (Google eBook)

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Langtree and O'Sullivan, 1840 - United States
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Page 414 - Memory and her siren daughters ; but by devout prayer to that Eternal Spirit who can enrich with all utterance and knowledge, and sends out his seraphim with the hallowed fire of his altar to touch and purify the lips of whom He pleases.
Page 377 - First in war, first in peace, first in the hearts of his countrymen," was originally used in the resolutions presented to Congress on the death of Washington, December, 1799.
Page 416 - Are they here The dead of other days? and did the dust Of these fair solitudes once stir with life And burn with passion? Let the mighty mounds That overlook the rivers, or that rise In the dim forest crowded with old oaks, Answer.
Page 85 - Treaty was one of the most important events in the history of the young republic.
Page 402 - And softly said, what glory's like to thee? Soul of this world, this Universe's eye, No wonder, some made thee a deity ; Had I not better known, (alas) the same had I.
Page 24 - ... the inhabitants living all mutilated in their limbs, each strong man with his right arm lamed? How much crueller to find the strong soul, with its eyes still sealed, its eyes extinct so that it sees not! Light has come into the world, but to this poor peasant it has come in vain.
Page 402 - If sO much excellence abide below ; How excellent is He that dwells on high ! Whose power and beauty by his works we know. Sure he is goodness, wisdome, glory, light, That hath this under world so richly dight : More heaven than earth was here no winter and no ui<;ht.
Page 12 - He did the two greatest things which, in politics, man can have the privilege of attempting. He maintained, by peace, that independence of his country which he had acquired by war. He founded a free government, in the name of the principles of order, and by reestablishing their sway.
Page 404 - Time! the fatal wrack of mortal things, That draws oblivion's curtains over kings, Their sumptuous monuments, men know them not, Their names without a record are forgot, Their parts, their ports, their pomp's all laid...
Page 417 - And hides his sweets, as in the golden age, Within the hollow oak. I listen long To his domestic hum,' and think I hear The sound of that advancing multitude Which soon shall fill these deserts. From the ground Comes up the laugh of children, the soft voice Of maidens, and the sweet and solemn hymn Of Sabbath worshippers.

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