Personality Not Included: Why Companies Lose Their Authenticity And How Great Brands Get it Back, Foreword by Guy Kawasaki: Why Companies Lose Their Authenticity And How Great Brands Get it Back (Google eBook)

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McGraw Hill Professional, Mar 31, 2008 - Business & Economics - 256 pages
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The age of the faceless corporation is over. In the new business era of the twenty first century, great brands and products must evoke a dynamic personality in order to attract passionate customers. Although many organizations hide their personality behind layers of packaged messaging and advertising, social media guru and influencer Rohit Bhargava counters that philosophy and illustrates how successful businesses have redefined themselves in the new customer universe.

Personality Not Included is a powerhouse resource packed with bold new insights that show you how to shed the lifeless armor of your business and rediscover the soul of your brand. Sharing stories from the ethos of the world's weirdest city, to how Manga has taken the comic book industry by storm, to showcasing brands like Intel, Boeing, ING, and Dyson, Bhargava shows you why personality matters from the inside out.

In Part One, you'll be introduced to the key components to building a personality and learn how to:

  • Recognize the greatest myth that most marketers blindly follow, and how to get past it
  • Use the “UAT Filter” to understand the personality of your organization and products in order to develop a communication strategy that drives your marketing
  • Create your company's “marketing backstory” using techniques pioneered by Hollywood screenwriters
  • Harness the influence of “accidental spokespeople” and use it to your advantage
  • Navigate the roadblocks of using personality that come from bosses, peers, investors, and lawyers, without getting fired or flamed
  • Pinpoint and capitalize on the moments where personality can make a difference

Part Two is packed with guides, tools, and techniques to help you flawlessly implement your plan. It features practical, step-by-step lessons that help you effectively move from theory to action, and includes a valuable collection of guides, checklists, question forms, printable resources, and more.

Don't be another faceless company-learn the new rules for succeeding in the social media era with Personality Not Included.

  

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Contents

Introduction
1
Part One
17
Intermission
182
Part Two
184
Appendices
285
Index
291
Acknowledgments
297
Meet the Author
301
Copyright

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Page xiv - image' you want for your brand. Image means personality. Products, like people, have personalities, and they can make or break them in the market place. The personality of a product is an amalgam of many things — its name, its packaging, its price, the style of its advertising, and, above all, the nature of the product itself Every advertisement should be thought of as a contribution to the brand image.
Page 138 - Awards, outlined his perspective on this subject in his book Bias, A CBS Insider Exposes How the Media Distort the News.™* In 1996, Goldberg wrote an op-ed in the Wall Street Journal on the media's "liberal bias" that created considerable reaction.
Page 57 - The legendary notebook used by European artists and thinkers for the past two centuries from Van Gogh to Picasso, from Ernest Hemingway to Bruce Chatwin.
Page 31 - Over the past ten years, in order to achieve the growth, development, and scale necessary to go from less than 1,000 stores to 13,000 stores and beyond, we have had to make a series of decisions that, in retrospect, have led to the watering down of the Starbucks experience, and, what some might call the commoditization of our brand.
Page 106 - There is a gigantic disconnect between these real, authentic conversations and the artificial voice of business executives and managers at every level. Their messages lack humanity in a world that craves more of it. Between meetings, memos, and managers, we've lost the art of conversation. Bull has become the language of business.
Page 30 - The key threat to the Starbucks brand was a growing belief among customers that the company was becoming corporate, predictable, inaccessible or irrelevant.
Page 15 - The problem with business is facelessness, and the first step is to admit that you have a problem and to recognize why it exists.
Page 20 - Myth: Cable piracy is wrong. Fact: Cable companies are big, faceless corporations, which makes it okay.
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Page 76 - The rest of this chapter will help you to learn how to develop all three qualities.

About the author (2008)

Rohit Bhargava is SVP of Digital Strategy and a founding member of the 360 Digital Influence group at Ogilvy Public Relations Worldwide, one of the world's largest marketing and communications agencies. He authors the award-winning Influential Marketing blog (rohitbhargava.typepad.com), is a sought after marketing speaker, and has been featured in media worldwide including The Wall Street Journal, Marketing China, and BrandWeek. Read about Rohit's latest updates and appearances at www.aboutrohit.com.

www.personalitynotincluded.com

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