The Fantastic Inventions of Nikola Tesla

Front Cover
Adventures Unlimited Press, 1993 - Biography & Autobiography - 351 pages
11 Reviews
This book is a readable compendium of patents, diagrams, photos and explanations of the many incredible inventions of the originator of the modern era of electrification. In Tesla's own words, are such topics as wireless transmission of power, death rays, and radio-controlled airships. In addition rare material on German bases in Antarctica and South America, and a secret city built at a remote jungle site in South America by one of Tesla's students, Guglielmo Marconi. Marconi's secret group claims to have built flying saucers in the 1940s and to have gone to Mars in the early 1950s! Incredible photos of these Tesla craft are included. The Ancient Atlantean system of broadcasting energy through a grid system of obelisks and pyramids is discussed and a fascinating concept comes out of one chapter that the Egyptian engineers had to wear a protective metal head-shields while in these power-plants, hence the Egyptian Pharoah's head covering as well as the Face on Mars! Tons more.
  

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Review: The Fantastic Inventions of Nikola Tesla

User Review  - Jeff - Goodreads

Essentially a lecture by Nikola Tesla which is great but lacks the visible component which would have existed at lecture which makes visualizing what is being described a challenge. A good number of pictures but still a challenge in some cases. Read full review

Review: The Fantastic Inventions of Nikola Tesla

User Review  - Berbs - Goodreads

Completely horrible book. I have no idea how anyone could have liked it. In many parts it is unreadable photo copies. The story line is meandering and repetitive. I am not sure how someone was paid money to produce it. Read full review

Contents

First Biographical Sketch 1691 Page
7
The First Patents 1606 to 1668 Page
17
Experiments With Alternate Currents
39
More Patents 1889 to 1900 Page
187
Transmission of Electric Energy Without Wires 1904 Page
219
Teslas Amazing DeathRay Page
247
The Most Unusual Inventions Page
273
The Last Patents 1913 to 1928 Page
285
Copyright

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About the author (1993)

Nikola Tesla (10 July 1856 - 7 January 1943) was a Serbian-American inventor, electrical engineer, mechanical engineer, physicist, and futurist best known for his contributions to the design of the modern alternating current (AC) electrical supply system. Tesla started working in the telephony and electrical fields before emigrating to the United States in 1884 to work for Thomas Edison. He soon struck out on his own with financial backers, setting up laboratories/companies to develop a range of electrical devices. His patented AC induction motor and transformer were licensed by George Westinghouse, who also hired Tesla as a consultant to help develop an alternating current system. Tesla is also known for his high-voltage, high-frequency power experiments in New York and Colorado Springs which included patented devices and theoretical work used in the invention of radio communication, for his X-ray experiments, and for his ill-fated attempt at intercontinental wireless transmission in his unfinished Wardenclyffe Tower project. Tesla's achievements and his abilities as a showman demonstrating his seemingly miraculous inventions made him world-famous. Although he made a great deal of money from his patents, he spent a lot on numerous experiments over the years. In the last few decades of his life, he ended up living in diminished circumstances as a recluse in Room 3327 of the New Yorker Hotel, occasionally making unusual statements to the press. Because of his pronouncements and the nature of his work over the years, Tesla gained a reputation in popular culture as the archetypal "mad scientist." He died impoverished and in debt on January 7, 1943. In 1960, in honor of Tesla, the General Conference on Weights and Measures for the International System of Units dedicated the term 'tesla' to the SI unit measure for magnetic field strength. Tesla's work fell into relative obscurity after his death, but since the 1990s, his reputation has experienced a comeback in popular culture. In 2005, he was listed amongst the top 100 nominees in the TV show The Greatest American, an open access popularity poll conducted by AOL and The Discovery Channel. His work and reputed inventions are also at the center of many conspiracy theories and have also been used to support various pseudosciences, UFO theories and New Age occultism.

David Hatcher Childress is the author of numerous books that focus on ancient astronauts, UFOs, and anti-gravity. In Extraterrestrial Archaeology: Incredible Proof We Are Not Alone, Childress uses photographs, drawings, and maps to demonstrate that the moons and planets in our solar system were once, and still are, inhabited by extraterrestrial beings. Childress's Lost Cities series, which includes Lost Cities of North and Central America and Lost Cities and Ancient Mysteries of South America, takes the reader on an incredible adventure through time exploring ancient mysteries and lost civilizations. Other Childress books include Anti-Gravity Handbook and Man-Made UFO's 1944-1994: 50 Years of Suppression, which was written with Renato Vesco. Childress resides in Kempton, Illinois.

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