Sex & violence, death & silence: encounters with recent art

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Faber and Faber, 2009 - Art - 554 pages
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'The Pop artists were among the first to understand the desire of consumers to change their lives through the purchase of clean, manufactured commodities. YBA, on the other hand, was more interested in the dirt that accrues beneath the laminate surface of shiny things. Their special perception was that cheap language and cheap materials didn't have to equal cheap thinking. The trick was to tell it in a jaunty, unportentous, off-hand, unliterary - anti-literary - way. And then there were the drugs.'Spanning nearly 35 years, Sex & Violence, Death & Silence is a collection of the best of Gordon Burn's writing on art. Focusing on two principle generations - the Royal College pop art of Hockney and his contemporaries, and the YBA sensations of the 1990s - it explores how these artists rose to prominence with their friends and contemporaries, and what happened next.Burn's work is fast becoming a kind of chronicle. Its factuality always connects with the broader poetic rythms of cultural life. Displaying all his customary insight and empathy, his writing adds up to much more than a collection of pieces on art: superbly evocative and engaging, it offers a pathway through two of the most important and vibrant periods in recent art history, and is another compelling and ruminative look at our culture.

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Contents

Francis Bacon
3
David Hockney
11
Peter Blake
41
Copyright

25 other sections not shown

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About the author (2009)

Gordon Burn was born in Newcastle upon Tyne on January 16, 1948. He began work as a journalist and wrote for several publications including the Guardian, Rolling Stone and Esquire. His novel, Alma Cogan, was published in 1991 and won the Whitbread Award for Best First Novel. During his lifetime he wrote four novels and several non-fiction books including Fullalove, The North of England Home Service, Somebody's Husband, Somebody's Son, Happy Like Murderers, Pocket Money, and Best and Edwards. He died of bowel cancer on July 17, 2009 at the age of 61.

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