History of the literature of ancient Greece [tr. by sir G.C. Lewis and J.W. Donaldson]. Continued by J.W. Donaldson (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Parker, 1858
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Contents

CHAPTER V
56
Interpolations in the Odyssey
81
The Odyssey posterior to the Iliad but both poems composed by the same person
82
Preservation of the Homeric poems by Bhapsodists and manner of their recitation
84
THE CYCLIC POETS
86
General character of the Homeric Hymns or Procemia
97
CHAPTER VIII
104
OTHER EPIC POETS
134
CHAPTER X
140
Metre of the Elegy
145
Tyrtseus his Life occasion and subject of his Elegy of Eunomia
148
Character and mode of recitation of the Elegies of Tyrtseus
150
Elegies of Archilochns their reference to Banquets mixture of convivial jollity Asius
151
Plaintive Elegies of Archilochns
153
Mimnermus his Elegies the expression of the impaired strength of the Ionic nation
154
Luxury a consolation in this state the Nanno of Mimnermus
156
Solons character his Elegy of Salamil
157
Elegies before and after Solons legislation the expression of his political feeling mixture of Gnomic Passages Phocylides
158
Elegies of Theognis their original character
161
Their personal reference to the Friends of Theognis
164
Elegies of Xenophanes their philosophical tendency
166
Epigrams in elegiac form their object and character Simonides as a composer of Epigrams
171
CHAPTER XL
172
Homeric comic poems Margites c
175
Scurrilous songs at meals at the worship of Demeter the Festival of Demeter of Paros the cradle of the Iambic poetry of Archilochus
176
Date and public life of Archilochus
178
His private life subject of his Iambics
179
Metrical form of his iambic and trochaic verses and different application of the two asynartetes epodes
180
Inventions and innovations in the musical recitation
184
Innovations in Language
185
Simonides of Amorgus his Satirical Poems against Women
186
Solons iambics and trochaics
187
Batrachomyomachia
195
PROGRESS OF THE GREEK MUSIC 1 Transition from the Epos through the Elegy and Iambus to Lyric Poetry connexion of Lyric Poetry with Mu...
197
His connexion with ancient Cretan worships Pseans and hyporchemes of Thaletas
212
Musicians of the succeeding periodClonas Hierax Xenodamus Xeno critus Polymnestus Sacadas
214
State of Greek Music at this period
216
Difference between the Lyric Poetry of the ffiolians and the Choral Lyric Poetry of the Dorians
218
Their connexion with his Poetry
222
The other subjects of his Poems
224
Their metrical form
226
Life and moral character of Sappho
228
Her Erotic Poetry to Phaon
231
Poems of Sappho to women
234
Hymenaeals of Sappho
236
Followers of Sappho Damophila Erinna
238
Life of Anacreon
239
His Poems to the youths at the Court of Polycrates
242
His lovesongs to Heterse
243
Character of his versification
245
Comparison of the later Anacreontics
247
Scolia occasions on which they were sung and their subjects
249
gradual rise of regular forms
253
Pindars descent his early training in poetry and music
287
THEOLOGICAL AND PHILOSOPHICAL POETRY
303
THE EARLY GREEK PHILOSOPHERS
316
THE EARLY GREEK HISTORIANS
342
Pherecydes his genealogical arrangement of traditions and history
348
CHAPTER XIX
352
CHAPTER XXII
392
the chorus
396
Form of the stage and its meaning in tragedy
398
Meaning of the entrances of the stage
400
The actors limitation of their number
401
Meaning of the protagonist deuteragonist tritagonist
404
The changes of the scene inconsiderable ancient tragedy not being a pic ture of outward acts
406
Eccyclema
409
Composition of the drama from various parts songs of the entire chorus
410
Division of a tragedy by the choral songs
412
Songs of single persons of the chorus and of the actors
413
Parts of the drama intermediate between song and speech
417
CHAPTER XXIII
420
The Phineus and the Glaucus Pontius
424
The Jltnaan Women
426
The Seven against Thebes
427
The Eleusinians
428
The Suppliants the Egyptians
431
The Prometheus bound
433
The Prometheus unbound
436
The Agamemnon
437
The Choiphorce
439
The En wen ides and the Proteus
440
General characteristics of the poetry of JEschylus
442
His latter years and death
444
first appearance
445
Subsequent events of his life his devotion to the drama
447
S Epochs in the poetry of Sophocles
449
Thorough change in the form of tragedy
450
Outline of his plays ike Antigone
452
The Electro
454
The Trachinian Women
456
King Edipui
457
The Ajax
459
The Philoctetes
461
The CEdipus at Colomu in connexion with the character and con duct of Sophocles in his latter years
463
The style of Sophocles
468
CHAPTER XXV
471
And Dew ex machinA
478
Comparative insignificance of the chorus Prevalence of monodies
480
Style of Euripides
482
the A Icestis
483
The Medea
484
The Hippolytns
485
IheBecuba
486
the Heraclcidce
487
The Suppliant
488
The Ion
489
The Raging Heracles
490
The Andromache
491
The Trojan Women
492
TheElectra
493
The Helena
494
The Ipkigenia at Tauri
495
The Oresta
496
The Phoenician Women
497
The Bacchanalians
498
The Iphigeniaat Aulis
499

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Page 26 - Thammuz came next behind, Whose annual wound in Lebanon allured The Syrian damsels to lament his fate In amorous ditties, all a summer's day; While smooth Adonis from his native rock Ran purple to the sea, supposed with blood Of Thammuz yearly wounded...
Page 527 - Together with Illustrative Selections from the Works of Lloyd, Cotton, Brooke, Darwin, and Hayley. With Notes and Memoirs, containing unpublished Letters of Cowper.
Page xxx - From the highest, As from the vilest thing of every day He learns to wean himself ; for the strong hours Conquer him.
Page 521 - Historical Lectures on the Life of Our Lord Jesus Christ : being the Hulsean Lectures for 1859. By the same Author. Fourth Edition. 8vo. 10s. 6d. The Destiny of the Creature ; and other Sermons preached before the University of Cambridge. By the same. Post 8vo. 5s. The Broad and the Narrow Way; Two Sermons preached before the University of Cambridge.
Page 515 - KINGSLEY, 5s. Oulita, the Serf; a Tragedy. By the Author of
Page xxx - For O ! he stood beside me, like my youth, Transformed for me the real to a dream, Clothing the palpable and the familiar With golden exhalations of the dawn. Whatever fortunes wait my future toils, The beautiful is vanished — and returns not.
Page 347 - I write these things as they seem to me to be true ; for the stories of the Greeks are many and ridiculous, as it seems to me.
Page 150 - BC), who went from Athens to Sparta, composed the most celebrated of his elegies on the occasion of the Messenian war, and when the Spartans were on a campaign, it was their custom after the evening meal, when the paean had been sung in honor of the gods, to recite these poems. From this time we find a union between the elegiac and iambic poetry; the same poet, who employs the elegy to express his joyous and melancholy emotions, has recourse to the iambus when his cool sense prompts him to censure...
Page 306 - Demeter and Cora, who was the personified expression not only of the most rapturous pleasure, but also of a deep sorrow for the miseries of human life.
Page 394 - Bacchic festivals, were an indispensable accompaniment to tragedy. They not only concealed the individual features of well-known actors, and enabled the spectators entirely to forget the performer in his part, but gave to his whole aspect that ideal character which the tragedy of antiquity demanded.

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