An Alternative Internet

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Edinburgh University Press, 2004 - Technology & Engineering - 176 pages
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This book explores how the Internet presents radical ways of organising and producing media that offer political and cultural alternatives, both to ways of doing business and to how we understand the world and our place in it. The book is characterised by in-depth case studies. Topics include the media of new social movements and other radical political organisations (including the far right); websites produced by fans of popular culture; and media dedicated to developing a critical, 'public' journalism. It locates these studies in appropriate theoretical and historical contexts, while remaining accessible to a student audience.Major themes:*The use of the Internet by political groups such as the anti-capitalist and environmental movements, as well as the far right*Radical forms of creativity and distribution: the anti-copyright and sampling/file-sharing movements, and their role as cultural critics in a corporate world*The development and maintenance of a global, 'digital public sphere' of protest through such practices as 'hacktivism'*The use of new media technologies to transform existing media forms and practices, such as news media and Internet radio.This is the first book devoted entirely to 'alternative' ways of political organisation and cultural production on the Internet. The author is one of the leading international experts in the study of alternative media, and this book is an authoritative guide to all aspects of these phenomena: the cultural, the political, the economic and the social. The range of topics covered will make it an attractive text for a wide range of media and cultural studies and computing courses.
  

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Contents

The Internet Power and Transgression
1
Cultural Studies and Alternative Media
2
History
5
Everyday Life Banality and Audiences
7
Power Relations and Alternative Media
9
Globalisation and the Internet
11
Legal Constraints
15
Electrons Civil Disobedience and the Power of Naming
18
Who are the BNP? Racism and the Everyday
77
Letter of Local Racism
79
The BNP in Cyberspace
81
Conclusion
88
Radical Creativity and Distribution Sampling Copyright and P2P
91
Sampling the Goods Sampling the Commons
92
Taking Sampling Fifty Times Beyond the Expected
96
Electronic Nonpropertarianism
99

The Internet as Triumph?
23
Radical Online Journalism
25
The Internet and New Social Movements
29
The Indymedia Network
31
Indymedia Network
36
The Ethics of Alternative Journalism
37
Native Reporting and Issues of Representation
42
Indymedia 911 and Beyond
46
Making Sense to Readers
51
The Possibilities of Radical Online Journalism
53
Conclusion
58
Farright Media on the Internet Culture Discourse and Power
61
A Theorectical Perspective
64
Examining the Discourse of Farright Media
65
The Twoway Play of Discourse
67
The Policies of the BNP
72
Constructing Cultural History
73
Social Authorship and P2P Networks
103
Creativity and Copyright
110
Alternative Radio and the Internet
114
Features and Characteristics
118
Resonance FM
123
Resonance and the Internet
133
Fan Culture and the Internet
138
The Nature and Purpose of Fanzines
139
A Theoretical Perspective
142
Progressive Rock on the Web
143
The Fanzine as Encyclopaedia
148
Musicians and Fanzines
150
Conclusion
154
Conclusion
156
References
161
Index
171
Copyright

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About the author (2004)


Chris Atton is Reader in Journalism at the Napier University, Edinburgh

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