The first administration of James Madison (Google eBook)

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Scribner, 1918 - United States
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Page 454 - board any of the public or private vessels of the United States any person or persons except citizens of the United States, or persons of color, natives of the United States. . . . No person who shall arrive in the United States from and after the time when this Act sball take effect shall be admitted to become a citizen of
Page 352 - victory was in our hands the ardor of the unengaged troops had entirely subsided. I rode in all directions, urged the men by every consideration to pass over; but in vain. Lieutenant-Colonel Bloom who had been wounded in the action returned, mounted his horse, and rode through the camp, as did also Judge
Page 145 - Ever since the report of the Committee on Foreign Relations came into the House," said Randolph on the last day of the debate," we have heard but one word, like the whippoorwill, but one monotonous tone, Canada, Canada, Canada!
Page 358 - about four thousand men without order or restraint discharging their muskets in every direction." They showed a preference for General Smyth's tent as their target, which caused the General to shift his quarters repeatedly. A few days afterward Peter B. Porter published a letter to a Buffalo newspaper, attributing the late disgrace "to the cowardice of General Smyth.
Page 403 - shrink from the separation of the States as an event fraught with incalculable evils; and it is among our strongest objections to the present course of measures that they have in our opinion a very dangerous and alarming bearing on
Page 38 - It was with real pain, my Lord, that I was forced to listen to arguments of the most profligate nature, such as that other nations were not so scrupulous; that the United States showed sufficient forbearance in not assisting the insurgents of South America and looking to their own interests in the present situation of that country.
Page 314 - was in our possession, I could march this army to Niagara or York (Toronto) in a very short time." This was Hull's last expression of confidence or hope. Thenceforward every day brought him fatal news. His army lost respect for him in consequence of his failure to attack Malden; the British strengthened the defences of
Page 369 - on the New Jersey coast, the lookout at the masthead discovered four sails to the northward, and two hours later a fifth sail to the northeast. Hull took them for Rodgers's squadron. The wind was light, and Hull being to windward determined to speak the 1 Hull to Secretary Hamilton, July 7, 1812 ; MSS. Navy Department.
Page 302 - arrival, Hull received orders from Washington authorizing him to invade Canada: " Should the force under your command be equal to the enterprise, consistent with the safety of your own post, you will take possession of Malden, and extend your conquests as circumstances may justify.
Page 329 - late at night August 13, he held a council the next day, said to have been attended by a thousand Indian warriors. 5 "Among the Indians whom I found at Amherstburg," he reported to Lord Liverpool,* " and who had arrived from distant parts of the country, I found some

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