Northanger abbey [followed by] Persuasion (Google eBook)

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Contents

I
1
II
5
III
11
IV
16
V
20
VI
23
VII
28
VIII
36
XXIX
192
XXX
201
XXXI
215
XXXII
222
XXXIII
227
XXXIV
235
XXXV
240
XXXVI
249

IX
43
X
52
XI
62
XII
70
XIII
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XIV
84
XV
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XVI
103
XVII
110
XVIII
114
XIX
120
XX
124
XXI
132
XXII
140
XXIII
149
XXIV
156
XXV
164
XXVI
172
XXVII
179
XXVIII
183
XXXVII
259
XXXVIII
268
XXXIX
277
XL
285
XLI
295
XLII
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XLIII
319
XLIV
326
XLV
333
XLVI
341
XLVII
347
XLVIII
357
XLIX
368
L
374
LI
384
LII
402
LIII
418
LIV
436
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Page 166 - Among the Alps and Pyrenees, perhaps, there were no mixed characters. There, such as were not as spotless as an angel, might have the dispositions of a fiend. But in England it was not so ; among the English, she believed, in their hearts and habits, there was a general though unequal mixture of good and bad.
Page 1 - A family of ten children will be always called a fine family, where there are heads and arms and legs enough for the number; but the Morlands had little other right to the word, for they were in general very plain, and Catherine, for many years of her life, as plain as any. She had a thin awkward figure, a sallow skin without colour, dark lank hair, and strong features — so much for her person; and not less unpropitious for heroism seemed her mind.
Page 2 - What a strange, unaccountable character! — for with all these symptoms of profligacy at ten years old, she had neither a bad heart nor a bad temper; was seldom stubborn, scarcely ever quarrelsome, and very kind to the little ones, with few interruptions of tyranny; she was moreover noisy and wild, hated confinement and cleanliness, and loved nothing so well in the world as rolling down the green slope at the back of the house.
Page 164 - Dear Miss Morland, consider the dreadful nature of the suspicions you have entertained. What have you been judging from ? Remember the country and the age in which we live. Remember that we are English, that we are Christians.
Page 216 - Vanity was the beginning and the end of Sir Walter Elliot's character, — vanity of person and of situation. He had been remarkably handsome in his youth, and at fifty-four was still a very fine man. Few women could think more of their personal appearance than he did ; nor could the valet of any new-made lord be more delighted with the place he held in society.
Page 164 - Could they be perpetrated without being known, in a country like this, where social and literary intercourse is on such a footing, where every man is surrounded by a neighbourhood of voluntary spies, and where roads and newspapers lay everything open?
Page 377 - The last few hours were certainly very painful," replied Anne: "but when pain is over, the remembrance of it often becomes a pleasure. One does not love a place the less for having suffered in it, unless it has been all suffering, nothing but suffering— which was by no means the case at Lyme.
Page 290 - Here is a nut,' said he, catching one down from an upper bough. 'To exemplify, - a beautiful glossy nut, which, blessed with original strength, has outlived all the storms of autumn. Not a puncture, not a weak spot any where. - This nut...
Page 356 - Mr. Elliot was rational, discreet, polished, — but he was not open. There was never any burst of feeling, any warmth of indignation or delight, at the evil or good of others. This, to Anne, was a decided imperfection. Her early impressions were incurable. She prized the frank, the open-hearted, the eager character beyond all others. Warmth and enthusiasm did captivate her still She felt that she could so much more depend upon the sincerity of those who sometimes looked or said a careless or a hasty...
Page 1 - Morland in her infancy, would have supposed her born to be an heroine. Her situation in life, the character of her father and mother, her own person and disposition, were all equally against her. Her father was a clergyman, without being neglected, or poor, and a very respectable man, though his name was Richard - and he had never been handsome. He had a considerable independence, besides two good livings — and he was not in the least addicted to locking up his daughters.

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