Self-regulated Learning and Academic Achievement: Theoretical Perspectives

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Barry J. Zimmerman, Dale H. Schunk
Lawrence Erlbaum Associates Publishers, 2001 - Education - 322 pages
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This volume brings together internationally known researchers representing different theoretical perspectives on students' self-regulation of learning. Diverse theories on how students become self-regulated learners are compared in terms of their conceptual origins, scientific form, research productivity, and pedagogical effectiveness. This is the only comprehensive comparison of diverse classical theories of self-regulated learning in print.

The first edition of this text, published in 1989, presented descriptions of such differing perspectives as operant, phenomenological, social learning, volitional, Vygotskian, and constructivist theories. In this new edition, the same prominent editors and authors reassess these classic models in light of a decade of very productive research. In addition, an information processing perspective is included, reflecting its growing prominence.

Self-regulation models have proven especially appealing to teachers, coaches, and tutors looking for specific recommendations regarding how students activate, alter, and sustain their learning practices. Techniques for enhancing these processes have been studied with considerable success in tutoring sessions, computer learning programs, coaching sessions, and self-directed practice sessions. The results of these applications are discussed in this new edition.

The introductory chapter presents a historical overview of research and a theoretical framework for comparing and contrasting the theories described in the following chapters, all of which follow a common organizational format. This parallel format enables the book to function like an authored textbook rather than a typical edited volume. The final chapter offers an historical assessment of changes in theory and trends for future research.

This volume is especially relevant for students and professionals in educational psychology, school psychology, guidance and counseling, developmental psychology, child and family development, as well as for students in general teacher education.

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About the author (2001)

Barry J. Zimmerman is a Professor Emeritus of Educational Psychology at the Graduate School and University Center of the City University of New York. He has conducted research and written extensively on the role of social learning and self regulatory processes of children, youth, and adults. He has written more than 200 research articles, book chapters, and professional conference papers. He has also authored or edited 14 books or journal volumes on social cognitive and self regulatory processes in the learning of children and youth. His most recent book is "Self-Regulated Learning and Academic Achievement: Theoretical Perspectives".

Paul R. Pintrich" is Professor of Education and Psychology and Chair of the Combined Program in Education and Psychology at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He also has served as the Associate Dean for Research for the School of Education at Michigan. He has a B.A. in psychology from Clark University in Worcester, Massachusetts, and an M.A. in developmental psychology, and a Ph.D. in education and psychology from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. His research focuses on the development of motivation and self-regulated learning in adolescence and how the classroom context shapes the trajectory of motivation and self-regulation development.

Paul has published over 100 articles and chapters and is co-author or co-editor of eight books, including the "Advances in Motivation and Achievement" series. He also has served as editor of Educational Psychologist, the American Psychological Association journal for Division 15Educational Psychology. His research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the Office of Educational Research and Improvement in the Department of Education, the Spencer Foundation, and the Kellogg Foundation.

Paul has served as President of Division 15-Educational Psychology for the American Psychological Association and is currently President-Elect of Division 5-Educational and Instructional Psychology for the International Association of Applied Psychology. He is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association and has been a National Academy of Education Spencer Fellow. He won the 1999 Best Research Review Article Award from the American Educational Research Association. He also has won the Class of 1923 Award from the College ofLiterature, Science, and Arts and the School of Education at the University of Michigan for excellence in undergraduate teaching.

"Dale H. Schunk" is Dean of the School of Education and Professor of Curriculum and Instruction at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. He holds a Ph.D. in Educational Psychology from Stanford University, an M.Ed. from Boston University, and a B.S. from the University of Illinois at Urbana. He has held faculty positions at Purdue University (where he served as Head of the Department of Educational Studies), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (where he also was Chair of the Academic Affairs Institutional Review Board), and the University of Houston.

Dale has edited six books, is author of "Learning Theories: An Educational Perspective" (Prentice Hall, 2000) and over 80 articles and book chapters. He has served as President of Division 15-Educational Psychology for the American Psychological Association and as Secretary of Division iLearning and Instruction for the American Educational Research Association. He is presently a member of the editorial boards of three professional journals.

Dale's teaching and research interests include learning, motivation, and self-regulation. He has received the Early Career Contributions Award in Educational Psychology from the American Psychological Association, the Albert J. Harris Research Award from the International Reading Association, and the Outstanding Service Award from the Purdue University School of Education.

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