Literature: an introduction to fiction, poetry, and drama

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Longman, 2002 - Literary Criticism - 2218 pages
8 Reviews
The most popular introduction of its kind, Literature 8/e, reflects a balance of classic works along with contemporary and non-Western authors. Writer's Perspectives sections give commentary on the craft of writing and revising from authors which provide insight and a more human perspective on literature and the writing process. Writing Critically sections expand coverage of composition with accessible and pragmatic suggestions on writing. Critical Approaches to Literature section provides three essays on every major school of criticism with sections on gender criticism and cultural studies. More than 150 photographs, author portraits, production shots of plays, and actors in performance-gives readers important perspectives. New casebooks on Flannery O'Connor and Raymond Carver, as well as two new drama casebooks: Sophocles and Shakespeare. New Stories and poems have been added. Two new plays: Stoppard's The Real Inspector Hound and Beckett's Krapp's Last Tape. A New Glossary of Literary terms has been added.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - pre20cenbooks - LibraryThing

Truly, I found this a very good intro to literature, reading and comprehension takes time, and skill, and literature has been known to be a stimulus to exploring other time periods, peoples. Reading ... Read full review

Review: Literature: An Introduction to Fiction, Poetry, and Drama, Ninth Edition

User Review  - Jessica - Goodreads

I bought this book for a college class. What I can recall that I read (in the Fiction book) was Edgar Allen Poe's "The Tell-Tale Heart", and "The Masque of the Red Death". I also read: "The Things ... Read full review

Contents

Preface
xli
About the Authors
liv
John Updike A P
14
Copyright

159 other sections not shown

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About the author (2002)

X. J. Kennedy was born in Dover, New Jersey, in 1929. After teaching English at the University of Michigan, the Woman's College of the University of North Carolina (now UNC-Greensboro), and Tufts University, he became a full-time writer in 1978. He has published six other collections of poetry, including Nude Descending a Staircase, which won the 1961 Academy of American Poets Lamont Prize; Cross Ties, awarded the 1985 Los Angeles Times Book Prize; and Dark Horses, which was published by Johns Hopkins in 1992. He has also written eighteen children's books, including Exploding Gravy (2002), and has coauthored several textbooks, including An Introduction to Poetry with Dana Gioia, now in its tenth edition. His numerous honors include the Aiken Taylor Award for Lifetime Achievement in Modern American Poetry, Guggenheim and National Arts Council fellowships, the Shelley Memorial Award, the Golden Rose of the New England Poetry Club, the Michael Braude Award for Light Verse, and the NCTE Award for Excellence in Poetry for Children. He lives with his wife, Dorothy, in Lexington, Massachusetts.

Born in Los Angeles in 1950, Dana Gioia attended Stanford University and did graduate work at Harvard, where he studied with Elizabeth Bishop and Robert Fitzgerald. He left Harvard to attend Stanford Business School. For fifteen years he worked in New York for general Foods (eventually becoming a Vice President) while writing nights and weekends, In 1992 he became a full-time writer. Currently he lives in California. Gioia has published three books of poems, Daily Horoscope (1986), The Gods of Winter (1991), and Interrogations at Noon (2001), which won the American Book Award. He is also the author of Can Poetry Matter? (1992; reprinted 2002). He has edited a dozen anthologies of poetry and fiction. A prolific critic and reviewer, he is also a frequent commentator on American culture for BBC Radio. He recently completed Nosferatu (2001), an opera libretto for composer Alva Henderson.

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