The Greenville Century Book: Comprising an Account of the Settlement of the County, and the Founding of the City of Greenville, S.C. (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Press of Greenville News, 1903 - Greenville (S.C.) - 162 pages
1 Review
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Things that seemed lost are really available here. Greenville's past comes alive.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 118 - WINSLOW'S SOOTHING SYRUP has been used for all these years by millions of mothers for their children 'while teething, 'with perfect success. It soothes the child, softens the gums, allays all pain; cures wind colic, and is the best remedy for diarrhoea. Sold by Druggists in Every Part of the World Be Sure and Ask for Mrs. WINSLOWS SOOTHING SYRUP And Take No Other Kind TWENTY-FIVE CENTS A BOTTLE Please mention "The Connecticut Magazine" when patronizing our advertisers.
Page 118 - Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup Has been used for over sixty years by millions of mothers for their children while teething, with perfect success. It soothes the child, softens the gums, allays all pain; cures wind colic, and is the best remedy for diarrhoea. Sold by druggists in every part of the world. Be sure and ask for MRS. WINSLOW'S SOOTHING SYRUP and take no other kind.
Page 110 - J 1 quart milk. 5 eggs. 2 tablespoonfuls melted butter. 1 " white sugar. \ dozen ears of corn large ones. Grate the corn from the cob ; beat the whites and yolks of the eggs separately. Put the corn and yolks together, stir hard, and add the butter ; then the milk gradually, beating all the while ; next the sugar and a little salt ; lastly the whites. Bake slowly at first, covering the dish, for an hour. Remove the cover, and brown finely.
Page 138 - Boil one minute. Let this cool, and add the yolks of the eggs, four heaping table-spoonfuls of the sugar, and the grated rind and juice of the lemon, all well beaten together. Have a deep pie plate lined with paste, and fill with this mixture. Bake slowly half an hour. Beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth, and gradually beat into them the remainder of the sugar. Cover the pie with this, and brown slowly.
Page 112 - Salt and nutmeg (lemon will do), Of baking powder teaspoons two. Lightly stir the flour in. Roll on pie 'board, not too thin; Cut in diamonds, twists or rings; Drop with care the doughy things Into fat that briskly swells Evenly the spongy cells. Watch with care the time for turning. Fry them brown, just short of burning. Roll in sugar. Serve when cool.
Page 124 - Carson. SPICED GRAPES. Five pounds grapes, three of sugar, two tea-spoons cinnamon and allspice, half tea-spoon cloves ; pulp grapes, boil skins until tender, cook pulps and strain through a sieve, add it to the skins, put in sugar, spices and vinegar to taste ; boil thoroughly and cool.
Page 6 - I have the pleasure of writing this by the side of a Chikkasah female, as great a princess as ever lived among the ancient Peruvians or Mexicans, and she bids me be sure not to mark the paper wrong after the manner of most of the traders; otherwise it will spoil the making good bread or homony!
Page 6 - The English traders are seldom without an Indian female for his bed-fellow, alleging these reasons as sufficient to allow of such a familiarity. First, they being remote from any white people, that it preserves their friendship with the heathens, they esteeming a white man's child much above one of their getting, the Indian mistress ever securing her white friend provisions whilst he stays amongst them.
Page 6 - ... and pay so dear for his pleasure. The Indians say, that the woman is a weak creature, and easily drawn away by the man's persuasion ; for which reason, they lay no blame upon her, but the man (that ought to be master of his passion) for persuading her to it.
Page 138 - ... salt, nutmeg, cinnamon and sugar to taste. Bake the same as squash pies. If the potatoes are very moist, use less milk. Lemon Pie. The juice and rind of one lemon, two eggs, eight heaping table-spoonfuls of sugar, one small tea-cupful of milk, one teaspoonful of corn-starch. Mix the corn-starch with a little of the milk. Put the remainder on the fire, and when boiling, stir in the corn-starch. Boil one minute. Let this cool, and add the yolks of the eggs, four heaping table-spoonfuls of the sugar,...

Bibliographic information