The Saloon: Public Drinking in Chicago and Boston, 1880-1920

Front Cover
University of Illinois Press, 1999 - Business & Economics - 380 pages
2 Reviews
This colorful and perceptive study presents persuasive evidence that the saloon, far from being a magnet for vice and crime, played an important role in working-class community life. Focusing on public drinking in "wide open" Chicago and tightly controlled Boston, Perry Duis offers a provocative discussion of the saloon as a social institution and a locus of the struggle between middle-class notions of privacy and working-class uses of public space.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

Review: The Saloon: Public Drinking in Chicago and Boston, 1880-1920

User Review  - Will Hunter - Goodreads

Excellent history of Chicago and the Saloons in Chicago. After reading it I suggest going to a real saloon called Schaller's Pump, 37th and Halstead, Chicago, IL. Interesting perspective on Chicago History. Read full review

Review: The Saloon: Public Drinking in Chicago and Boston, 1880-1920

User Review  - Robert - Goodreads

Interesting analysis of the evolution of public drinking in Massachusetts and Chicago. Many funny insights into the reasons for local variations in the patterns of drinking and economics of running a Saloon in those cities before prohibition. Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
From Entrepreneur to Employee
15
The Saloon as a Small Business The Function of Failure
46
The Saloon and the Public Neighborhood
86
Public Politics and the Saloon
114
The Public Melting Pot
143
The Saloon in a City of Strangers
172
The Triumph of Moral Geography
204
Saloon Crime From WideOpen to Underground Vice
230
The Long Slow Death of the Saloon
274
Comments on Primary Sources
305
Notes
307
Index
363
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1999)

Perry R. Duis is professor of history at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Bibliographic information