Familiar Letters on Public Characters, and Public Events: From the Peace of 1783, to the Peace of 1815 (Google eBook)

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Russell, Odiorne, and Metcalfe, 1834 - United States - 468 pages
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Page 187 - If there be any among us who would wish to dissolve this Union, or to change its republican form, let them stand, undisturbed, as monuments of the safety with which error of opinion may be tolerated, where reason is left free to combat it.
Page 415 - In the discharge of this trust, I will only say, that I have with good intentions contributed towards the organization and administration of the government, the best exertions of which a very fallible judgment was capable. Not unconscious, in the outset, of the inferiority of my qualifications, experience in my own eyes, perhaps still more in the eyes of others, has strengthened the motives to diffidence of myself...
Page 436 - Each individual of the society has a right to be protected by it in the enjoyment of his life, liberty, and property, according to standing laws.
Page 348 - ... the proportion which the aggregate of the other classes of citizens bears in any State to that of its husbandmen, is the proportion of its unsound to its healthy parts, and is a good enough barometer whereby to measure its degree of corruption.
Page 194 - The judiciary of the United States is the subtle corps of sappers and miners constantly working under ground to undermine the foundations of our confederated fabric. They are construing our constitution from a co-ordination of a general and special government to a general and supreme one alone.
Page 361 - say nothing of my religion. It is known to my God and myself alone. Its evidence before the world is to be sought in my life ; if that has been honest and dutiful to society, the religion which has regulated it cannot be a bad one.
Page 233 - Peace, tranquillity, and innocence shed their mingled delights around him. And to crown the enchantment of the scene, a wife, who is said to be lovely even beyond her sex, and graced with every accomplishment that can render it irresistible, had blessed him with her love and made him the father of several children.
Page 241 - Let Mrs. Hamilton be immediately sent for let the event be gradually broken to her; but give her hopes.
Page 211 - They will bring with them the principles of the governments they leave, imbibed in their early youth ; or, if able to throw them off, it will be in exchange for, an unbounded licentiousness, passing, as is usual, from one extreme to another. It would be a miracle were they to stop precisely at the point of temperate liberty.
Page 78 - WASHINGTON administration must be ashamed to appear and as to you, Sir, treacherous in private friendship (for so you have been to me, and that, in the day of danger,) and a hypocrite in public life, the world will be puzzled to decide whether you are an apostate or an imposter; whether you have abandoned good principles, or whether you ever had any...

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