In Many Wars, by Many War Correspondents (Google eBook)

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George Lynch, Frederick Palmer
LSU Press, 2010 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 264 pages
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"There are few people in the world who have more opportunity for getting close to the hot interesting things of one's time than the special correspondent of a great paper," George Lynch, a veteran British correspondent, wrote in Impressions of a War Correspondent, published in 1903. He made it all sound glorious, just the way war correspondents like to recount their experiences on the battlefield. But in a few months he had less to exult about. Lynch and a distinguished throng of foreign correspondents with high hopes of a good story assembled in Tokyo to cover the Russo-Japanese War -- a monumental conflict that would mark the first modern defeat of a Western force by an Asian one -- only to discover that the authorities would not let them "close to the hot interesting things."

Corralled in the Imperial Hotel, the journalists had nothing much to do except tell stories in the bar and write about local flora. A few of them, including Jack London and Richard Harding Davis, decided to contribute short autobiographical stories recounting their most exciting journalistic experiences for a book to be edited by Lynch and his American colleague, Frederick Palmer. The correspondents told their tales in different ways -- prose, poems, sketches, and even a short play. Their stories recounted their routines, failures, and triumphs, including durviving battles and waiting to see action. One contributor imagines bewhiskered correspondents in 1950 still awaiting permission from Japan to go to the front -- only to learn the war had been over for thirty-nine years.

Printed locally by a Japanese printer and largely forgotten until now, In Many Wars, by Many War Correspondents offers colorful stories and insights about the lives and personalities of some of history's most celebrated war correspondents. With a foreword by John Maxwell Hamilton that chronicles the circumstances under which the contributors compiled the book, this new edition opens a window into the fascinating world of foreign newsgathering at the turn of the twentieth century.

  

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Contents

A Naval Engagement
1
President McKinleys Assassination and From Our Special at the Front
5
Under the Fire of an International Fleet
11
A Night at Deaths Door
17
A Battle with the Waves
21
Michaels of Michaelmas Bay
25
Fifteen Hours Under Fire
31
My Most Strenuous Campaign
35
Saving a Column
113
Waiting
117
R T P s
119
A Camera and a Journey
123
Nippon Banzai
131
An Unpleasant Choice
135
An Attempt That Failed
141
Wars Mercies and Wars Satires
145

In Modoc
39
How Stephen Crane took Juana Dias
43
He That Died o Wednesday
47
One Days Work in Cuba
49
A Startling Surprise
55
The Penalty of War Corresponding
59
February 8th
65
The Cowboy and the Rattlesnake
69
How South Americans Fight
73
The Hat and the Hapenny
79
A Night Attack on Boshof
83
A Balkan Episode
87
A Mango and a Rumor
91
The Breakup
95
A Trip to New York as a Steward
97
A Veldt Vendetta
101
Treasure Trove
105
How I Was Nearly Beheaded and o
107
The War and the Walker
149
Adrift on an IcePack
155
An Adventure in Bulgaria
159
Taking It Lying Down
163
Without Orders
167
A Message from Andree
171
The Canadians at Paardeberg
177
A Fiji Incident
183
The Devotions of an Emperor
187
Impression Pénible
191
How I Selected a Campaign Outfit
193
Sognando
197
Saved by a Desert Quail
201
A Boxer Charge
207
Four Stone Ten
209
Translation of C Victor Thomass Impression Pénible
211
Translation of Alberto Troises Sognando
213
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

John Maxwell Hamilton, a former foreign correspondent, is the author of Journalism's Roving Eye: A History of American Foreign Reporting and other books. He is executive vice chancellor and provost of Louisiana State University, LSU Foundation Hopkins P. Breazeale Professor, and the founding dean of LSU's Manship School of Mass Communication.

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