Men of mathematics, Volume 2

Front Cover
Simon & Schuster, Oct 15, 1986 - Biography & Autobiography - 590 pages
21 Reviews
Here is the classic, much-read introduction to the craft and history of mathematics by E.T. Bell, a leading figure in mathematics in America for half a century. Men of Mathematics accessibly explains the major mathematics, from the geometry of the Greeks through Newton's calculus and on to the laws of probability, symbolic logic, and the fourth dimension. In addition, the book goes beyond pure mathematics to present a series of engrossing biographies of the great mathematicians -- an extraordinary number of whom lived bizarre or unusual lives. Finally, Men of Mathematics is also a history of ideas, tracing the majestic development of mathematical thought from ancient times to the twentieth century. This enduring work's clear, often humorous way of dealing with complex ideas makes it an ideal book for the non-mathematician.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
8
4 stars
8
3 stars
5
2 stars
0
1 star
0

Review: Men of Mathematics

User Review  - Manny Tingplants - Goodreads

Biographical and historical information on most of the prime contributors to mathematics. Arranged roughly chronologically (some lives and careers overlap). I only read Volume I, spanning from Ancient ... Read full review

Review: Men of Mathematics

User Review  - Hairuo - Goodreads

1.master read master's composer; 2.they all learn math early; 3. Newton's story of apple is not welcome in masters; 4. Archimedes is greater than Euclid; 5. The most greatest masters in history ... Read full review

Contents

INTRODUCTION
3
MODERN MINDS IN ANCIENT BODIES
19
GENTLEMAN SOLDIER AND MATHEMATICIAN
35
Copyright

26 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1986)

Eric Temple Bell was born in 1883 in Aberdeen, Scotland. His early education was obtained in England. Coming to the United States in 1902, he entered Stanford University and took his A.B. degree in 1904. In 1908 he was teaching fellow at the University of Washington, where he took his A.M. degree in 1909. In 1911 he entered Columbia University, where he took his Ph.D. degree in 1912. He returned to the University of Washington as instructor in mathematics and became full professor in 1921. During the summers of 1924-28 he taught at the University of Chicago, and in 1926 (first half) at Harvard University, when he was appointed Professor of Mathematics at the California Institute of Technology.

Dr. Bell was a former President of the Mathematical Association of America, a former Vice President of the American Mathematical Society and of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He was on the editorial staffs of the Transactions of the American Mathematical Society, the American Journal of Mathematics, and the Journal of the Philosophy of Science. He belonged to The American Mathematical Society, the Mathematical Association of America, the Circolo Matematico di Palermo, the Calcutta Mathematical Society, Sigma Xi, and Phi Beta Kappa, and was a member of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States. He won the B˘cher Prize of the American Mathematical Society for his research work. His twelve published books include The Purple Sapphire (1924), Algebraic Arithmetic (1927), Debunking Science, and Queen of the Sciences (1931), Numerology (1933), and The Search for Truth (1934).

Dr. Bell died in December 1960, just before the publication of his latest book, The Last Problem.

Bibliographic information