Le Morte Darthur

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Wordsworth Editions, Jan 1, 1996 - Fiction - 912 pages
11 Reviews

With an Introduction by Helen Moore.

The legend of King Arthur and his knights of the Round Table is one of the most enduring and influential stories in world literature. Its themes - love, war, religion, treachery and family loyalty - are timeless, as are the reputations of its major characters, Arthur, Merlin, Guenever and Launcelot.

Malory's Le Morte Darthur is a story of noble knights, colourful tournaments and fateful love, set in a courtly society which is outwardly secure and successful, but in reality torn by dissent and, ultimately, treachery. Originally published in 1485, Malory's Le Morte Darthur is here presented in modern spelling and is accompanied by an Introduction and helpful Glossary.

  

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Review: Le Morte d'Arthur, Vol. 1

User Review  - Katy Wilmotte - Goodreads

A lengthy read (this is only volume one of two) but well worth it. Malory has a unique style of prose that moves you along, and is sometimes just downright funny. Even better, Malory is a gem to ... Read full review

Review: Le Morte d'Arthur, Vol. 1

User Review  - Marie - Goodreads

Love this book, it has a certain charm to it that you don't find anymore. Lots of jousting, knight challenges, dragon fighting, damsels in distress, magical warfare, etc. The medieval stories have a ... Read full review

Contents

died at his birth wherefore she named him Tristram
239
How Tristram enterprized the battle to fight for the truage
245
How Sir Tristram was put to the keeping of La Beale Isoud
251
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About the author (1996)

Sir Thomas Malory, 1405 - 1471 Sir Thomas Malory's works (consisting of the legends of Sir Lancelot, Sir Gareth, Sir Tristram, and the Holy Grail, as well as the stories of King Arthur's coming to the throne, his wars with the Emperor Lucius, and his death) are the most influential expression of Arthurian material in English. The author's sources are principally French romances; his own contributions are substantial, however, and the result is a vigorous and resonant prose. "Le Morte d'Arthur," finished between March 1469 and March 1470, was first printed in 1485 by William Caxton, the earliest English printer. Malory is presumed to have been a knight from an old Warwickshire family, who inherited his father's estates about 1433 and spent 20 years of his later life in jail accused of various crimes. The discovery of a manuscript version of "Le Morte d'Arthur" in 1934 in the library of Winchester College, supported the identification of Malory the author with Malory the traitor, burglar, and rapist. It showed that many of the inconsistencies in the printed text were traceable to the printing house rather than to the author. The most reliable modern version, therefore, is one like Eugene Vinaver's that is based on the Winchester manuscript.

Helen Moore is a University Lecturer in English at the University of Oxford, and a Fellow of Corpus Christi College. She has published editions of Amadis de Gaule (2004) and Guy of Warwick (2007), and is currently working on a book on the English reception of Amadis de Gaule.

Tom Griffith has also translated Plato's The Republic, Symposium, Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Phaedo, and Phaedrus.

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