Building Character in American Boy: The Boy Scouts, YMCA, and Their Forerunners, 1870-1920

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Univ of Wisconsin Press, Sep 1, 2004 - History - 464 pages
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Among established American institutions, few have been more successful or paradoxical than the Boy Scouts of America. David Macleod traces the social history of America in this scholarly account of the origins of the Boy Scouts and other character-building agencies, through which adults tried to restructure middle-class boyhood.

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Contents

Adult Ambitions and Concerns
29
Temperance Orders
83
An Ideology
97
The Attempted Professionalization of YMCA Boys Work
117
The Invention of Boy Scouting
130
The Organization and Expansion of the Boy Scouts
146
Creation and Defense
171
Winning Institutional Support and Volunteer Leaders
188
Recruiting a Fine Lot of Lads
212
An Organized Setting for the New Boyhood
233
Adult Instruction and Boys Responses
248
Group Experience Membership Turnover
268
Conclusion and Epilogue
291
Notes
309
Index
390
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About the author (2004)

David I. Macleod, professor of history at Central Michigan University, was involved with the Boy Scouts from ages eight through twenty. He is author of The Age of the Child: Children in American 18901920.

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