Selected Dialogues

Front Cover
OUP Oxford, Aug 27, 2009 - Literary Collections - 304 pages
1 Review
'you'll find another man to harvest, Glycerion: let this one go' The Greek satirist Lucian was a brilliantly entertaining writer who invented the comic dialogue as a vehicle for satiric comment. His influence was immense, not only in the Greek world, but on later European writers such as Rabelais and Swift. His dialogues puncture the pretensions of pompous philosophers and describe the daily lives of Greek courtesans; they are peopled by politicians, historians and ordinary citizens, as well as by gods and mythic figures. This selection provides a cross-section of Lucian's styles and satirical targets, from serious polemic to lighter squibs and character portrayals. It includes How to Write History and his most famous piece, A True History, a fabulous tale of space travel and a monstrous whale which prefigures the fantasies of Jules Verne. This lively new translation is both accurate and idiomatic, and the introduction highlights Lucian's importance in his own and later times. ABOUT THE SERIES: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the widest range of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, helpful notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.

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Review: Selected Dialogues

User Review  - Charles Dee Mitchell - Goodreads

For any fan of Greek literature, Lucian (120 - 180 AD) is a wonkish delight. He began his career as a rhetorician for hire, preparing court arguments for whomever needed them. As his fame grew, he ... Read full review

Review: Selected Dialogues

User Review  - Julie-ann Robson - Goodreads

the origins of the story of the sorcerer's apprentice! Read full review

About the author (2009)

C. D. N. Costa is Emeritus Professor of Classics at the University of Birmingham.

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