The Sweet Everlasting: A Novel

Front Cover
University of Georgia Press, 1996 - Fiction - 194 pages
8 Reviews
Sharecropper's son, mill worker, and ex-convict, Ellis Burt surely knows adversity. For a brief and cherished time there was a woman, and then a child, who had been a kind of salvation to him. Then they were gone, leaving Ellis to carry on with the burden of what he had done to them - the ruin he brought down upon them all.
In The Sweet Everlasting, Ellis is seventy-four. Moving back and forth over a lifetime of memories, he recalls his Depression-era boyhood, the black family who worked the neighboring farm, his time in prison, and the subsequent years adrift - working jobs no one else would take and longing for a chance to rejoin what is left of his family. Ever in the background are the memories of his wife, Susan, and their boy, W. D., and how Ellis drew on her strength and his innocence to resist everything that threatened to harden him: the shame that others would have him feel, the poverty he had known, and the distorted honor and pride he witnessed in others and knew was inside him as well.
  

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Review: The Sweet Everlasting

User Review  - Andy Fraenkel - Goodreads

It starts off with the narrator saying he had spent time in prison. This unusual love story unfolds in well placed bits and pieces. Exquisitely told. Read full review

Review: The Sweet Everlasting

User Review  - Sarah Mollner - Goodreads

I love this book. I have read it multiple times. The way he describes the simple things in life, waking up with your love one in the morning sun, how the air smells at home brings you more into the ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

I
3
III
8
IV
28
V
32
VI
48
VII
57
VIII
61
IX
66
XVI
126
XVII
137
XVIII
144
XIX
156
XX
158
XXI
160
XXII
170
XXIII
171

X
84
XI
93
XII
98
XIII
104
XIV
112
XV
123
XXIV
174
XXV
177
XXVI
185
XXVII
187
XXVIII
189
Copyright

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About the author (1996)

Judson Mitcham is chair of the psychology department at Fort Valley State College.

Bibliographic information