Select Speeches, Forensick and Parliamentary: With Prefatory Remarks, Volume 5 (Google eBook)

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Nathaniel Chapman
Hopkins and Earle, 1808 - Trials
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Page 42 - Of law there can be no less acknowledged, than that her seat is the bosom of God, her voice the harmony of the world ; all things in heaven and earth do her homage, the very least as feeling her care, and the greatest as not exempted from her power...
Page 391 - Protestant religion, of this country, against the arbitrary cruelties of Popery and the Inquisition, if these more than Popish cruelties and inquisitorial practices are let loose among us...
Page 391 - These abominable principles, and this more abominable avowal of them, demand the most decisive indignation.
Page 382 - We do not know the worst; but we know that in three campaigns we have done nothing and suffered much.
Page 383 - You may swell every expense and every effort still more extravagantly; pile and accumulate every assistance you can buy or borrow; traffic and barter with every little pitiful German prince that sells and sends his subjects to the shambles...
Page 387 - In a just and necessary war, to maintain the rights or honour of my country I would strip the shirt from my back to support it. But in such a war as this, unjust in its principle, impracticable in its means, and ruinous in its consequences, I would not contribute a single effort nor a single shilling. I do not call for vengeance on the heads of those who have been guilty; I only recommend to them to make their retreat. Let them walk off, and let them make haste, or they may be sure that speedy and...
Page 388 - Lords, since they had neither sagacity to foresee, nor justice nor humanity to shun, these oppressive calamities; since not even severe experience can make them feel, nor the imminent ruin of their country awaken them from their stupefaction, the guardian care of parliament must interpose.
Page 381 - Paris they transact the reciprocal interests of America and France. Can there be a more mortifying insult? Can even our ministers sustain a more humiliating disgrace ? Do they dare to resent it? Do they presume even to hint a vindication of their honor, and the dignity of the state, by requiring the dismission of the plenipotentiaries of America...

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