HISTORY OF THE WAR GERMANY AND FRANCE. (Google eBook)

Front Cover
1871
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Contents

The Battle of WoerthMacMahons Last Charge
153
Map of the Battlefields of Saarbnick and Spicheren
156
Stragglers from the French Army entering Saverne
161
The Bourse Sacked by the Mob
163
The Arch of Triumph Through which the Germans Marched out of Paris
167
Place Vend6me and Napoleon Column Headquarters of the Army of Paris
168
CHAPTER V
169
Paris
175
Map of the Country Around Metz Showing the Battlefields from August 14th 1870 to the Surrender of the City
182
Battle of GravelotteMomentary Repulse of the Prussians
189
Gen Von Steinmetz
201
CHAPTER VI
202
Paris Captured by the Mob in Sept 1870
214
The Attack on the Village of Mouzon by the Prussians on the day before the battle of Sedan
217
Map of the Country Around Sedan Showing Battlefields etc
218
View of the Village of Bazeilles after the Battle
235
The Field Guns captured by the Prussians at Sedan
237
Paris Resi dence of the Emperor Napoleon before the War
248
The Emperor Napoleon on his way to Bellvue Castle
255
A Prussian Officer receiving the parole of the French Officers included in the Capitulation of Sedan
261
French Prisoners of War on the March at Night after the Battle of Sedan
265
Prince Frederick Charles
267
CHAPTER VII
268
showing the Pont de la Con corde Scene of the Revolution of September 1870
275
Last Session of the French Senate
283
The Gardens of the Tuileries Used as an Artillery Camp du ring the Siege
289
Paris
293
Parisby which the Empress Escaped
301
CHAPTER VIII
333
Principal Market of Paris
337
Castle of Yincennes The principal Arsenal of Paris
341
Paris Scene of the Plight of the Empress Eugenie
352
The Crown Prince of Prussia viewing Paris from the Heights of Chatillon
357
Sevres Porcelain Factory and Heights of St Cloud Fortified by the Germans
361

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Page 242 - Not having been able to die in the midst of my troops, it only remains for me to place my sword in the hands of your Majesty. I am your Majesty's good brother, NAPOLEON.
Page 66 - Her Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, His Majesty the Emperor of Austria, King of Hungary and Bohemia, His Majesty the King of the French...
Page 743 - It ii printed from large, clear type, on fine white paper made expressly for this Bible, and contains over One Thousand Pages, and over One Hundred Illustrations, and bound in the most handsome and substantial manner. In Arabesque Leather, Marbled Edge, at $ 7.50 per Copy. " " " Gilt " at 9.00 " " In French Morocco, Full Gilt, Panelled Sides, at 13.00 " " The following are specimens of the letters that we have received from Clergymen, and from agents who are selling our Bibles : New Milford,...
Page 245 - We were both much moved at seeing each other again under such circumstances. What my feelings were I had seen Napoleon only three years before at the summit of his power is more than I can describe.
Page 51 - Under these circumstances, France will know how to do her duty. The most ardent wishes will follow you to the army, the command of which you assume, accompanied by your son, who, anticipating the duties of maturer age, will learn, by your side, how to serve his country. Behind you, behind our army, accustomed to carry the noble flag of France, stands the whole nation ready to recruit it. Leave the regency without anxiety in the hands of our august sovereign the empress. To the authority commanded...
Page 462 - ... wanting. What has failed us has been a decisive resolution and the consecutive execution of our plans. That which failed us after the shameful capitulation at Sedan was arms. All supplies of this nature had been sent on to Sedan, Metz, and Strasburg, as if, one would think, the authors of our disaster, by a last criminal combination, had desired, at their fall, to deprive us of all means of repairing our ruin.
Page 67 - Europe, who, furnished with full powers which have been found in good and due form, have successively...
Page 253 - ... however, lack of provisions and ammunition, and the absolute impossibility of any further defence imposed upon him, as a general, the duty of suppressing his personal feelings, as further bloodshed could in no way alter the situation. The permission for the officers to be released on parole was received with great thankfulness, as an expression of your Majesty's intention not to hurt the feelings of an army, which had fought bravely, beyond the point demanded by the necessity of our political...
Page 308 - Such is, sir, what Europe must know. We have not accepted power with any other object ; we will not keep it a moment if we should not find the population of Paris and the whole of France decided to share our resolutions. I sum up these resolves briefly in presence of God who hears me, in the face of posterity, which shall judge us. We wish only for peace, but if this disastrous war, which we have condemned, is continued against us, we shall do our duty to the last, and I have the firm confidence...
Page 741 - Being the most extensive subscription book Publishers in the United States, and having four houses, we can afford to sell books cheaper and pay Agents more liberal commissions than any other company. Our books do not pass through the hands of General Agents, (as nearly all other subscription...

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