The horse's foot, and how to keep it sound. [With] An appendix (Google eBook)

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1863
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Page 4 - The toe of the fore foot encounters the combined force and weight of the fore hand and body, and consequently in a state of nature is exposed to considerable wear and tear, and calls for greater strength and substance of horn than is needed by any portion of the hind foot, where the duty of supporting the hinder parts alone is distributed over the quarters and heels of both sides of the foot The bars are continuations of the wall, reflected at the heels towards the centre of the foot, where they...
Page 13 - ... edges of the hoof are to be rasped, and the sole pared out, as a thick one impedes the descent of the coffin bone. An operator errs oftener by removing too little than too much — the frog excepted, although from its being cut as easily as Gruyere cheese, and its then looking so smooth and clean, ' it requires more philosophy than falls to the share of most smiths to resist the temptation to slice away.
Page 2 - efficient apparatus for effecting this necessary elasticity, being " no longer allowed to act by reason of these restraints, becomes " altered in structure : and the continued operation of the same " causes, in the end, circumscribes the elasticity to those parts " alone where no nails have been driven, — giving rise to a train "of consequences destructive to the soundness of the foot, and " fatal to the usefulness of the horse.
Page 3 - ... and expanding to the weight of the horse is proportionably increased, clearly indicating, that those parts cannot be nailed to an unyielding bar of iron without a most mischievous interference with the natural functions of the foot. In the hind foot the greatest thickness of horn will be found in the quarters and heels, and not, as in the fore foot, at the toe.
Page 1 - ... the foot is avoided. But if a large portion of the circumference of the foot be fettered by iron and nails, it is obvious that that portion, at least, cannot expand as before ; and the beautiful and efficient apparatus for effecting this necessary elasticity, being no longer allowed to act by reason of these restraints, becomes altered in structure : and the continued operation of the same causes, in the end, circumscribes the elasticity to those parts alone where no nails have been driven, —...
Page 3 - Its elasticity as long as possible. soundness of the foot, and fatal to the usefulness of the horse.* The toe of the fore foot is the thickest and strongest portion of the hoof, and is in consequence less expansive than any other part, and therefore better calculated to resist the effect of the nails and shoe. The thickness of the horn gradually diminishes towards the quarters and * The horse•s foot, and how to keep it sound, with illustrations, by Wm . Miles, Esq ANATOMY OF THE FOOT.
Page 4 - ... constitute a union combining strength and elasticity in a wonderful degree. The horny sole covers the whole inferior surface of the foot, excepting the frog. In a well-formed foot it presents an arched appearance and possesses considerable elasticity, by virtue of which it ascends and descends, as the weight above is either suddenly removed from it, or forcibly applied to it.
Page 5 - ... horn, produces inflammation, and perhaps " abscess. The effect of this squeezing of the sensible sole is " most commonly witnessed at the angle of the inner heel, where " the descending heel of the coffin-bone, forcibly pressing the vas" cular sole upon the horny sole, ruptures a small blood-vessel, " and produces what is called a corn, but which is, in fact, a bruise. " The horny frog occupies the greater part of the triangular " space between the bars, and extends from the hindermost part "...
Page 13 - For instance, it is manifestly unwise to pare the sole as thin in a hot dry season, when the roads are broken up and strewed with loose stones, as in a moderately wet one, when they are well bound and even ; for, in the former case, the sole is in perpetual danger of being bruised by violent contact with the loose stones, and consequently needs a...
Page 54 - ... to horses' feet. The great latitude extended to the meaning of words in horse-dealing transactions has shorn it of every attribute which gave it value, until it conveys no other guarantee than this, that the horse is not palpably lame in one foot only ; for if he chance to be lame in both fore-feet, the pain of allowing the weight to rest upon either will cause him to pass it as quickly as possible from one to the other, and not only save him from condemnation, but most probably gain for him...

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