Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
C. L. Webster, 1892 - Dummies (Bookselling) - 1230 pages
8 Reviews
  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - wildbill - LibraryThing

This is an excellent book about the Civil War written by one of the major figures of the war. The book provides a candid, truthful look at the people and events of the war from an intelligent man with ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - sanjuanslim - LibraryThing

the book has no index !!! would not recommend it to anyone. such a famous book for the "publisher" to be so cheap as to leave this improtant part out. shame on you!! Would not have orderd it if i had known this about it. Read full review

Contents

I
17
II
32
III
45
IV
61
V
74
VI
84
VII
92
VIII
107
XXI
282
XXII
294
XXIII
316
XXIV
330
XXV
353
XXVI
371
XXVII
385
XXVIII
404

IX
119
X
129
XI
140
XII
162
XIII
175
XIV
191
XV
200
XVI
210
XVII
229
XVIII
242
XIX
254
XX
269
XXIX
414
XXX
422
XXXI
437
XXXII
456
XXXIII
473
XXXIV
485
XXXV
499
XXXVI
522
XXXVII
532
XXXVIII
548
XXXIX
571
Copyright

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Page 593 - This book is a preservation photocopy. It is made in compliance with copyright law and produced on acid-free archival 60# book weight paper which meets the requirements of ANSI/NISO Z39.48-1992 (permanence of paper) Preservation photocopying and binding by Acme Bookbinding Charlestown, Massachusetts...
Page 326 - Your neglect of repeated orders to report the strength of your command, has created great dissatisfaction, and seriously interfered with military plans. Your going to Nashville without authority, and when your presence with your troops was of the utmost importance, was a matter of very serious complaint at Washington, so much so that I was advised to arrest you on your return.
Page 53 - For myself, I was bitterly opposed to the measure, and to this day regard the war, which resulted, as one of the most unjust ever waged by a stronger against a weaker nation.
Page 311 - Yours of this date, proposing armistice and appointment of commissioners to settle terms of capitulation, is just received. No terms except unconditional and immediate surrender can be accepted. I propose to move immediately upon your works.
Page 249 - As we approached the brow of the hill from which it was expected we could see Harris' camp, and possibly find his men ready formed to meet us, my heart kept getting higher and higher until it felt to me as though it was in my throat. I would have given anything then to have been back in Illinois, but I had not the moral courage to halt and consider what to do ; I kept right on.
Page 106 - After they had started, the tents and cooking utensils had to be made into packages, so that they could be lashed to the backs of the mules. Sheet-iron kettles, tent-poles and mess chests were inconvenient articles to transport in that way. It took several hours to get ready to start each morning, and by the time we were ready some of the mules first loaded would be tired of standing so long with their loads on their backs. Sometimes one would start to run, bowing his back and kicking up until he...
Page 588 - The Table. How to Buy Food, How to Cook It, and How to Serve It, by A.
Page 312 - The distribution of the forces under my command incident to an unexpected change of commanders and the overwhelming force under your command compel me, notwithstanding the brilliant success of the Confederate arms yesterday, to accept the ungenerous and unchivalrous terms which you propose.
Page 521 - While a battle is raging one can see his enemy mowed down by the thousand, or the ten thousand, with great composure; but after the battle these scenes are distressing, and one is naturally disposed to do as much to alleviate the suffering of an enemy as a friend.
Page 492 - I do not calculate upon the possibility of supplying the army with full rations from Grand Gulf. I know it will be impossible without constructing additional roads. What I do expect is to get up what rations of hard bread, coffee and salt we can, and make the country furnish the balance.

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