History of the Greek Revolution: Compiled from Official Documents of the Greek Government (Google eBook)

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W. W. Reed & Company, 1828 - Greece - 498 pages
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Page 478 - I did not lose a moment in obeying my "master's orders, and on informing Dr. Bruno and Mr. Millingen of it, they said it was very right, as they now began to be afraid themselves. On returning to my master's room, his first words were, ' Have you sent ? 'I have, my lord,' was my answer ; upon which he said, ' You have done right, for I should like to know what is the matter with me.
Page 474 - I cannot quit Greece while there is a chance of my being of (even supposed) utility, — there is a stake worth millions such as I am, — and while I can stand at all, I must stand by the cause. While I say this, I am aware of the difficulties, and dissensions, and defects, of the Greeks themselves ; but allowance must be made for them by all reasonable people.
Page 479 - Mr. Parry desired him to compose himself. He shed tears, and, apparently, sunk into a slumber. Mr. Parry went away, expecting to find him refreshed on his return — but it was the commencement of the lethargy preceding his death. The last words I heard my master utter were at six o'clock on the evening of the 18th, when he said, « I must sleep now;" upon which he laid down never to rise again!
Page 423 - Albion, and anchored close alongside a ship of the line, bearing the flag of the Capitana Bey, another ship of the line, and a large double-banked frigate, each thus having their opponent in the front line of the Turkish fleet.
Page 414 - His Majesty the King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, his Majesty the King of France and Navarre, and his Majesty the Emperor of all the Russias...
Page 477 - His lordship continued to get weaker, and on the 17th he was bled twice in the morning, and at two o'clock in the afternoon ; the bleeding at both times was followed by fainting fits, and he would have fallen down more than once, had I not caught him in my arms. In order to prevent such an accident, I took care not to let his lordship stir without supporting him.
Page 471 - Greek cause, the unlooked-for disappointment preyed on his spirits, and produced a degree of irritability which, if it was not the sole cause, contributed greatly to a severe fit of epilepsy, with which he was attacked on the 15th of February.
Page 477 - I do not, however, believe that his lordship had any apprehension of his fate -till the day after, the 18th, when he said, ' I fear you and Tita will be ill by sitting up constantly night and day.' I answered, ' we shall never leave your lordship till you are better.
Page 474 - In a few days P. Mavrocordato and myself, with a considerable escort, intend to proceed to Salona at the request of Ulysses and the Chiefs of Eastern Greece, and take measures offensive and defensive for the ensuing campaign. Mavrocordato is almost recalled by the new Government to the Morea (to take the lead, I rather think), and they have Written to propose to me, to go either to the Morea with him, or to take the general direction of affairs in this quarter— with General Londo, and any other...
Page 421 - Pacha consented in his conference of the 25th of September last, with the English and French Admirals, acting likewise in the name of the Russian Admiral, the said Pacha did, the very next day, violate his engagement by causing his fleet to come out, with a view to its proceeding to another point in the Morea.

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