Ten years' Queen's scholarship questions, 1870-9, with answers to arithmetic, algebra, and mensuration (Google eBook)

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1880
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Page 33 - Yet must I not give Nature all ; thy art, My gentle Shakespeare, must enjoy a part. For though the poet's matter nature be, His art doth give the fashion ; and, that he Who casts to write a living line, must sweat (Such as thine are) and strike the second heat Upon the Muses...
Page 34 - Through all the compass of the notes it ran, The diapason closing full in Man. What passion cannot Music raise and quell? When Jubal struck the chorded shell, His listening brethren stood around, And, wondering, on their faces fell To worship that celestial sound. Less than a god they thought there could not dwell Within the hollow of that shell, That spoke so sweetly, and so well.
Page 4 - Serene will be our days and bright, And happy will our nature be, When love is an unerring light, And joy its own security.
Page 31 - On the contrary, a spacious horizon is an image of liberty, where the eye has room to range abroad, to expatiate at large on the immensity of its views, and to lose itself amidst the variety of objects that offer themselves to its observation. Such wide and undetermined prospects are as pleasing to the fancy as the speculations of eternity or infinitude are to the understanding.
Page 140 - At length the freshening western blast Aside the shroud of battle cast; And, first, the ridge of mingled spears Above the brightening cloud appears; And in the smoke the pennons flew , As in the storm the white sea-mew.
Page 123 - If, from the ends of the side of a triangle, there be drawn two straight lines to a point within the triangle, these shall be less than, the other two sides of the triangle, but shall contain a greater angle. Let...
Page 62 - With solemn steps and slow, High potentates, and dames of royal birth, And mitred fathers in long order go : Great Edward, with the lilies on his brow From haughty Gallia torn, And sad Chatillon, on her bridal morn That wept her bleeding Love, and princely Clare.
Page 46 - Still, where rosy pleasure leads, See a kindred grief pursue ; Behind the steps that misery treads, Approaching comfort view : The hues of bliss more brightly glow, Chastised by sabler tints of woe ; And blended, form with artful strife The strength and harmony of life.
Page 91 - Where Corydon and Thyrsis met Are at their savoury dinner set Of herbs and other country messes, Which the neat-handed Phillis dresses; And then in haste her bower she leaves, With Thestylis to bind the sheaves; Or, if the earlier season lead, To the tanned haycock in the mead.
Page 18 - In every village mark'd with little spire, Embower'd in trees, and hardly known to fame, There dwells, in lowly shed and mean attire, A matron old, whom we Schoolmistress name : Who boasts unruly brats with birch to tame...

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