How to Kill Adventist Education: (and how to Give it a Fighting Chance!) (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Review and Herald Pub Assoc, 2009 - Education - 160 pages
4 Reviews
Between 1980 and 2005 Seventh-day Adventist Church membership in the North American Division increased by 75 percent. In that same 25-year period K-12 enrollment in Adventist schools dropped by nearly 25 percent. What happened? And why?How to Kill Adventist Education takes a hard look at the troubles plaguing Adventist schools. Not only are those problems identified, along with their root causes, but a simple yet effective strategy for change is proposed. And by using this proven strategy, failing schools have successfully transformed into thriving centers of Christ-oriented education.So yes, there is hope for Adventist education. Now, lets get down to business!
  

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User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Super cool congratulations!!
I could not find an email to write straight to you. Sorry for doing it here. My question is IF God gave you a book to write and is to save Gods schools,and is so important... Why don't you give it out free? Is money more important than salvation?? Blessings ;)

Review: How to Kill Adventist Eductation (and How to Give It a Fighting Chance!)

User Review  - Terry - Goodreads

This is an excellent book for any church educator! It is easy to read, packed full of concise advice and right on target. I highly recommend it for anyone concerned about making church schools excellent and successful. Read full review

Contents

FOREWORD
11
Chapter
33
Chapter
99
Chapter
107
Chapter
119
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Shane Anderson is the senior pastor of the New Market church in New Market, Virginia. He has served on multiple school boards, school finance committees, accreditation teams, and building committees, and has been a member of conference and academy executive committees. He has been keenly observing what works-and what doesn't-in the Adventist education system for nearly 15 years.

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