John Tuttle and His Descendants: Being a Continuation of the Large Volume of the Tuttle History, a Copy of which is on File at the Public Library, Springfield, Ohio (Google eBook)

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publisher not identified, 1914 - 46 pages
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Page 4 - Say not, because he did no wondrous deed, Amassed no worldly gain, Wrote no great book, revealed no hidden truth. Perchance he lived in vain, For there was grief within a thousand hearts The hour he ceased to live; He held the love of women, and of men Life has no more to give. Charlotte Becker.
Page 5 - INQUIRING into the pedigree of an idea is not a bad means of roughly estimating its value. To have come of respectable ancestry, is prima facie evidence of worth in a belief as in a person...
Page 6 - Tuttle or his more remote descendants married, were written up. We should then have a basis for comparison. If it were found on such comparison that the branches of such families as were of Tuttle descent, exhibited more of these characteristics, or exhibited them more decidedly or more generally than those branches of such families as were not of Tuttle descent, then it seems to us a fair inference, that such characteristics were inherited from or through the Tuttle...
Page 7 - Our conclusion is that the characteristics referred to, are more clearly and decidedly traceable to the Tuttle stock than to any other. It is plain that somewhere along the ancestral lines of this strain of blood a remarkable energy has been infused that has shown itself in every form of human activity and achievement. In theology it produced an Edwards; among educators a Dwight and a Woolsey; in art, a Kensett; in literature, a Peter Parley. It learned all languages in the sweat and grime of the...
Page 6 - Trowbridges and others, likenesses do appear in the branches of Tuttle descent, that are not found to the same extent in the others. And the inference derived from such likeness is strengthened by apparent diversities and contrasts, between the Tuttle branches and the others. We do not intend to pursue the comparison; we merely suggest it as furnishing ground for a reasonable probability.
Page 7 - ... any other. It is plain that somewhere along the ancestral lines of this strain of blood a remarkable energy has been infused that has shown itself in every form of human activity and achievement. In theology it produced an Edwards; among educators a Dwight and a Woolsey; in art, a Kensett; in literature, a Peter Parley. It learned all languages in the sweat and grime of the blacksmith's forge, in Burritt. It marched to the sea with Sherman. It wrote histories with the half-blind eyes of Prescott.
Page 6 - The race is not only prolific, but fitted to endure. It follows that wherever they have been long seated their descendants will be more numerous, as a rule, than those of other settlers of equal date.
Page 6 - Connecticut, of twenty-two deasons of the first church, from its foundation in 1716 to 1864, eleven or one-half are of this family. In some branches nine-tenths are church members and so general is the religious inclination that it may well be called a family trait.
Page 5 - That the blood is or has been prolific is a matter of common observation. Joined to that is the quality of endurance.
Page 6 - Britain show that but one Welshman to ten English and fifteen Irish are convicted of crime. They are strongly emotional, poetical and religious.

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