A manual of telephony (Google eBook)

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Whittaker and Co., 1893 - Telephone - 508 pages
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Page 4 - Watson, at the far end of the line, holding his mouth close to a stretched membrane, such as you see before you here, carrying a little piece of soft iron, which was thus made to perform in the neighborhood of an electro-magnet in circuit with the line motions proportional to the sonorific motions of the air.
Page 4 - This, the greatest by far of all the marvels of the electric telegraph, is due to a young countryman of our own, Mr. Graham Bell, of Edinburgh and Montreal, and Boston, now becoming a naturalised citizen of the United States.
Page 2 - It is certain that in a more or less distant future speech will be transmitted by electricity.
Page 445 - The twist-test will be made as follows: The wire will be gripped by two vises, one of which will be made to revolve at a speed not exceeding one revolution per second. The twists thus given to the wire will be reckoned by means of an ink mark which forms a spiral on the wire during torsion, the full number of twists to be visible between the vises.
Page 2 - Suppose that a man speaks near a movable disk sufficiently pliable to lose none of the vibrations of the voice, and that this disk alternately makes and breaks the current from a battery; you may have at a distance another disk which will simultaneously execute the same vibrations.
Page 3 - In the Canadian department I heard ' To be or not to be ' ' there's the rub,' through an electric telegraph wire; but, scorning monosyllables, the electric articulation rose to higher flights, and gave me passages taken at random from the New York newspapers: 'SS Cox has arrived,' (I failed to make out the SS Cox), 'The city of New York...
Page 4 - Boston, now becoming a naturalized citizen of the United States. Who can but admire the hardihood of invention which devised such very slight means to realize the mathematical conception that, if electricity is to convey all the delicacies of quality which distinguish articulate speech, the strength of its current must vary continuously and as nearly as may be in simple proportion to the velocity of a particle of air engaged in constituting the sound...
Page 16 - ... When we sing into a piano, certain of the strings of the instrument are set in vibration sympathetically by the action of the voice with different degrees of amplitude, and a sound, which is an approximation to the vowel uttered, is produced from the piano. Theory shows, that, had the piano a very much larger number of strings to the octave, the vowel sounds would be perfectly reproduced. My idea of the action of the apparatus, shown in fig. 19, was this : Utter a sound in the neighbourhood of...
Page 2 - Incited thereto by my lessons in physics in the year 1860, I attacked a work begun much earlier concerning the organs of hearing, and soon had the joy to see my pains rewarded with success, since I succeeded in inventing an apparatus by which it is possible to make clear and evident the functions of the organs of hearing, but in which also one can produce tones of all kinds at 1 v. Guillemin, " Le Monde Physique,
Page 4 - To be or not to be, . . . there's the rub,' through an electric telegraph wire; but, scorning monosyllables, the electric articulation rose to higher flights, and gave me passages taken at random from the New York newspapers: 'SS Cox has arrived' (I failed to make out the SS Cox) ; 'The City of New York,

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