Major David Ziegler (Google eBook)

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F.J. Heer Printing Company, 1912 - Cincinnati (Ohio) - 50 pages
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Page 16 - To perpetuate, therefore, as well the Remembrance of this Vast Event as the mutual Friendships which have been formed under the Pressure of common Danger, and in many Instances cemented by the Blood of the Parties, the Officers of the American Army do hereby in the most Solemn Manner associate, constitute, and combine themselves into one Society of Friends, to endure as long as they shall endure or any of their Eldest Male Posterity, and in failure thereof the Collateral Branches, who may be judged...
Page 16 - It having pleased the Supreme Governor of the Universe, in the disposition of human affairs, to cause the separation of the Colonies of North America from the domination of Great Britain, and after a bloody conflict of eight years, to establish them free, independent, and sovereign States, connected, by alliances founded on reciprocal advantages, with some of the greatest princes and powers of the earth.
Page 33 - The committee conceive it but justice to the commander in chief, to say, that, in their opinion, the failure of the late expedition can, in no respect, be imputed to his conduct, either at any time before or during the action...
Page 16 - An incessant attention to preserve inviolate those exalted rights and liberties of human nature for which they have fought and bled, and without which the high rank of a rational being is a curse instead of a blessing. An unalterable determination to promote and cherish, between the respective states, that union and national honor so essentially necessary to their happiness and the future dignity of the American empire.
Page 16 - To perpetuate, therefore, as well the remembrance of this vast event as the mutual friendships which have been formed under the pressure of common danger, and, in many instances, cemented by the blood of the parties, the officers of the American army do hereby, in the most solemn manner, associate, constitute, and combine themselves into one Society of Friends, to endure as long as they shall endure, or any of their eldest male posterity, and in failure thereof the collateral branches who may be...
Page 18 - The Military Policy of the United States ;" That nearly all the dangers which threatened the cause of independence may be traced to the total inexperience of our statesmen in regard to military affairs, which led to vital mistakes in army legislation.
Page 19 - That when a nation at war relies upon a system of regulars and volunteers, or regulars and militia, the men. in the absence of compulsion, or very strong inducements, will invariably enlist in the organizations most lax in discipline.
Page 34 - Never give up: for the wisest is boldest, Knowing that Providence mingles the cup; And of all maxims, the best, as the oldest, Is the stern watchword of 'Never give up! ' " Be firm ; one constant element of luck Is genuine, solid, old Teutonic pluck.
Page 25 - ... expected from Fort Pitt, coming down on the other side of Kerr's Island. We crossed the river and met them. Captain Zeigler commanded the company of new levies of fifty-five men. There were about fifty Indians in canoes lashed together. The soldiers were paraded in a very large boat, stood up on a platform, and were properly paraded, with the American flag in the stern. Just as we got up to them they began to fire by platoons. After they had fired, the Indians fired from their canoes singly or...
Page 16 - QUINTIUS CINCINNATUS, and being resolved to follow his example, by returning to their citizenship, they think they may with propriety denominate themselves the SOCIETY OF THE CINCINNATI. " The following principles shall be immutable, and form the basis of the Society of the Cincinnati. " An incessant attention to preserve inviolate those exalted rights and liberties of human nature, for which they have fought and bled, and without which the high rank of a rational being is a curse instead of a blessing....

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