The Renaissance philosophy of man: Selections in translation

Front Cover
Ernst Cassirer, Paul Oskar Kristeller, John Herman Randall
University of Chicago Press, 1967 - Philosophy - 405 pages
3 Reviews
Despite our admiration for Renaissance achievement in the arts and sciences, in literature and classical learning, the rich and diversified philosophical thought of the period remains largely unknown. This volume illuminates three major currents of thought dominant in the earlier Italian Renaissance: classical humanism (Petrarch and Valla), Platonism (Ficino and Pico), and Aristotelianism (Pomponazzi). A short and elegant work of the Spaniard Vives is included to exhibit the diffusion of the ideas of humanism and Platonism outside Italy. Now made easily accessible, these texts recover for the English reader a significant facet of Renaissance learning.

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User Review  - davidpwithun - LibraryThing

This book is a fascinating introduction not just to the "Renaissance philosophy of man" (as the title has it) but to Renaissance philosophy in general. The introductions to each piece presented are ... Read full review

Review: The Renaissance Philosophy of Man: Petrarca, Valla, Ficino, Pico, Pomponazzi, Vives

User Review  - David Withun - Goodreads

This book is a fascinating introduction not just to the "Renaissance philosophy of man" (as the title has it) but to Renaissance philosophy in general. The introductions to each piece presented are ... Read full review

Contents

General Introduct1on
1
Introduct1on By Hans Nachod
23
A Selfportra1t
34
Copyright

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About the author (1967)

John Herman Randall, Jr., is Frederick J. E. Woodbridge Professor Emeritus of Philosophy, Columbia University. He is the author of many works in philosophy and intellectual history, among them "Aristotle," "The Career of Philosophy," Vols. I and II, "How Philosophy Uses its Past," "Nature and Historical Experience" and "Philosophy After Darwin: Chapters for" The Career of Philosophy, "Volume III," "and Other Essays," all published by Columbia University Press.

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