Tokens Issued in the Seventeenth Century in England, Wales, and Ireland: By Corporations, Merchants, Tradesmen, Etc (Google eBook)

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J. R. Smith, 1858 - Tokens - 630 pages
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Page viii - Smith, who issued above one hundred Tokens, have not a single Charles amongst them. James, being a Scripture name, has been more fortunate, though it is not so common as might have been expected. The accumulation of the patent farthings in the hands of small tradesmen, caused the latter so great a loss, from the refusal of the patentees to rechange them, that in 1644, in consequence of the public clamour, they were suppressed by the House of Commons, which ordered that they should be rechanged from...
Page xxiii - On the Tokens the initial of the surname is usually placed over those of the Christian names of the husband and wife : though sometimes the wife's initial is at the top, sometimes the three initials are in a line, the middle one being the surname, and at other times the surname is at the bottom.
Page xxi - ... unless the intrinsick value of the coyn be equal, or near to that value for which it is made currant ; have thought fit, by advice of our Privy Council, to cause certain farthings and halfpence of copper to be stamped at our Mint, according to such form and with such impression as we have directed : and we have given special charge to our officers there, that they cause such halfpence and farthings so to be coyned, to contain as much copper in weight, as shall be of the true intrinsick value...
Page xii - In the upper cross-piece was fastened an iron box with a female screw, through which there passed a stout iron screw of an inch or more diameter, to the bottom of which was fixed one of the dies; whilst the other was received into a square hole made in the bottom...
Page xxi - Proclamation authorised and allowed, or shall offer to counterfeit any of our halfpence or farthings, we shall hold all such offenders utterly inexcusable, and shall cause their contempt of our laws and government to be chastised with exemplary severity. " Given at our Court of Whitehall, the 16th day of August, in the 24th year of our reign, 1672. "God save the King!
Page xxi - ... day of August, shall pass and be received in all payments, bargains, and exchanges to be had or made between our subjects, which shall be under the value of sixpence, and not otherwise, nor in any other manner. And if any person or persons, bodies politique or corporate, shall after the first day of September next, presume to make, vend, or utter any pence, halfpence and farthings, or other pieces of brass, copper, or other base...
Page xv - Tea, the staple by which grocers now make gross fortunes, had not then obtained its footing; for this lymph must then have been beyond the means of most sippers, seeing that in 1666 a pound of tea cost sixty shillings ; and money was then at a far higher value than in the present century. The multifarious ramifications of those traders j ustified the application of the term grocers, as well as to those ' engrossing ' merchandise, because they sold by the gross.
Page xx - ... payable at the shop of the issuer, they were very inconvenient. The Government had for some time intended the circulation of royal copper money, as we have patternpieces of halfpennies and farthings of the year 1665 ; but it was not until the year 1672 that the farthings of Charles II., of a similar size to those of the present day, were ready for circulation. Tradesmen's Tokens were then at once put down by the following stringent Proclamation :
Page xx - Corporations upon pretence that there was wanted small moneys to be currant in low and ordinary payments amongst the poorer sort, have presumed to cause certain pieces of Brass, Copper and other Base Metals to be stamped with their private stamps and then imposed those pieces upon our poor subjects for Pence Halfpence or Farthings as the...
Page viii - ... worth of them at a time on all with whom they had dealings. In a short time, not only the City of London, but the whole kingdom, and especially the counties adjacent to the metropolis Kent, Essex, Suffolk, and Norfolk were so burdened with them, that in many places scarcely any silver or gold coin was left, the currency consisting entirely of farthing Tokens. The issue of this patent was one of the many arbitrary acts of the first two Stuart kings, which tended to destroy the attachment...

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