Reconstructing the Criminal: Culture, Law, and Policy in England, 1830-1914

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Cambridge University Press, Aug 26, 1994 - History - 381 pages
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This ambitious and imaginative work interprets criminal justice history by relating it to intellectual and cultural history. Starting from the assumption that policies and statutes originate in a society's values and norms, the author skillfully and persuasively demonstrates how changes in criminal law and penal practice were related to the changing values of early, mid, and late Victorian and Edwardian society. Wiener traces changes in the criminal justice system by examining the treatment of offenders. During the Victorian period the system became more punitive and then reformed to be more welfarist. This work offers insight into the contemporary Anglo-American penal system. In addition, Wiener's wide-ranging discussion of issues, most notably of free will versus determinism, sheds light on a broad range of Victorian history, beyond crime and punishment.
  

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Contents

criminal policy as cultural history
1
From willfulness to wreckage
10
reforming the law
46
reformed punishment
92
system
101
A changing human image
159
Late Victorian social policy a changing context
185
The demoralizing of criminality
215
the erosion of moral
257
Disillusion with the prison
308
penal regime
321
social debility and positive punishment
337
Index
382
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About the author (1994)

Wiener is the Mary Gibbs Jones Professor of History at Rice University.

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