The beauties of Scotland: containing a clear and full account of the agriculture, commerce, mines, and manufactures; of the population, cities, towns, villages, &c. of each county ... (Google eBook)

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Printed for Thomson Bonar and John Brown [and 7 others], 1806 - Architecture
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Page 445 - Napier lord of Markinston, hath set my head and hands at work with his new and admirable logarithms. I hope to see him this summer, if it please God ; for I never saw a book which pleased me better, and made me more wonder.
Page 446 - My lord, I have undertaken this long journey purposely to see your person, and to know by what engine of wit or ingenuity you came first to think of this most excellent help into astronomy, viz. the logarithms ; but, my lord, being by you found out, I wonder nobody else found it out before, when now known it is so easy.
Page 446 - Napier was doubtful he would not come. It happened, one day, as John Marr and the Lord Napier were speaking of Mr. Briggs ; ' Ah, John,' said Marchiston, ' Mr. Briggs will not now come.
Page 458 - I believe, have been difficult for a chemist to ascertain the nature of this liquid, though perfectly transparent ; it had lost all its pungent qualities, its taste being quite vapid. " The head reclined on a pillow, and, as the covering decayed, it was found to contain a collection of strongscented herbs. Balm, sage, and mint were easily distinguished ; and it was the opinion of many, that the body was filled with the same.
Page 167 - Hyffidg at London, for some time, about two years ago ; has been since at home painting here like a Raphael sets out for the seat of the beast, beyond the Alps, within a month hence to be away about two years. I'm sweer to part with him, but canna stem the current which flows from the advice of his patrons and his own inclination.
Page 456 - ... bright as the day they were lodged in the tomb. " WHAT rendered this scene more striking, and truly interesting, was, that the body of her son and only child, the natural heir of the title and estates of Kilsyth, lay at her knee. His features were as composed as if he had been only asleep. His colour was as fresh, and his flesh as plump and full, as in the perfect glow of health ; the smile of infancy and innocence sat on his lips. His shroud was not only entire, but perfectly clean, without...
Page 158 - I observed in the composition, arises from the shape of the picture. The painter should have allowed himself more height, which would have removed the opening at the top to a greater distance, and have given a more dismal aspect to the inside of the den. At present the opening is rather paltry. This has induced some judges to suppose, what does not seem improbable, that the picture was not originally painted on one great plan ; but that the painter, having pleased himself with the figure of Daniel,...
Page 456 - ... ribbons as bright, as the day they were lodged in the tomb. What rendered this scene more striking, and truly interesting, was, that the body of her son, and only child, the natural heir of the title and estates of Kilsyth, lay at her knee. His features were as composed as if he had been only asleep.
Page 457 - I could not but regret that snch rudeness had been offered to the ashes (remains) of the dead, as to expose them thus to the public view. " The body seemed to have been preserved in some liquid nearly of the colour and appearance of brandy. The whole coffin seemed to have been full of it, and all its contents saturated with it.
Page 427 - I protest before God and your lordships, that I profess and allow with my heart the true religion presently professed within this realm, and authorised by the laws thereof ; I shall abide thereat, and defend the same to my life's end, renouncing the Roman religion called papistry.

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