The Werewolf in Lore and Legend

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Courier Dover Publications, Dec 1, 2003 - Body, Mind & Spirit - 307 pages
10 Reviews
The first definitive work on werewolfery, this book was written by a venerable author of occult studies. Unsurpassed in its sheer scope and depth, it employs a theological and philosophical approach, incorporating an extensive range of historical documentation and folklore. Summers examines the supernatural practice of shapeshifting, notes the finer distinctions between werewolfery and lycanthropy, and explores the differences of opinion on exactly how ordinary humans are transformed into creatures of "unbridled cruelty, bestial ferocity, and ravening hunger." His Gothic style, rich in fascinating examples and anecdotes, offers compelling fare for lovers of esoteric lore. Unabridged republication of the classic 1933 edition.
  

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Review: The Werewolf in Lore and Legend

User Review  - Curtis Runstedler - Goodreads

Montague Summers' book on werewolves is exhaustively researched and draws from a wealth of medieval, Greek, Latin, and early Modern manuscripts. The results are very informative and beautifully ... Read full review

Review: The Werewolf in Lore and Legend

User Review  - Lori Schiele - Goodreads

I was disappointed by this book. It covered a lot of the history of the werewolf legend but wasn't very interesting. The writing was dry. Read full review

Contents

THE WEREWOLF LYCANTHROPY
1
THE WEREWOLF HIS SCIENCE AND PRACTICE
63
GREECE ITALY SPAIN AND PORTUGAL
133
ENGLAND AND WALES SCOTLAND AND IRELAND
178
FRANCE
217
THE NORTH RUSSIA AND GERMANY
242
Copyright

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Werewolves
Stephen Krensky
Limited preview - 2006
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About the author (2003)

Heinrich Kramer ( 1430-1505) also known under the Latinized name Henricus Institoris, was a German churchman and inquisitor. Born in Selestat, Alsace, he joined the Dominican Order at an early age and while still a young man was appointed Prior of the Dominican house of his native town. At some date before 1474 he was appointed Inquisitor for the Tyrol, Salzburg, Bohemia and Moravia. His eloquence in the pulpit and tireless activity received recognition at Rome and he was the right-hand man of the Archbishop of Salzburg. By the time of the Bull Summis desiderantes of Pope Innocent VIII in 1484 he was already associated with Jacob Sprenger to make an inquisition for witches and sorcerers. In 1485 he drew up a treatise on witchcraft which was incorporated in the Malleus Maleficarum (literally "The hammer of malefactresses (wrongdoing women - i.e. witches)"). Kramer failed in his attempt to obtain endorsement for this work from the top theologians of the Inquisition at the Faculty of Cologne, and they condemned the book as recommending unethical and illegal procedures, as well as being inconsistent with Catholic doctrines of demonology. Kramer's claimed endorsement from four of the professors may have been forged. He was denounced by the Inquisition in 1490. In 1495 he was summoned to Venice to give public lectures, which were very popular. In 1500 he was empowered to proceed against the Waldensians and Picards. He died in Bohemia in 1505.

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