Democracy (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Apr 2, 2007 - Political Science - 313 pages
9 Reviews
Democracy identifies the general processes causing democratization and de-democratization at a national level across the world over the last few hundred years. It singles out integration of trust networks into public politics, insulation of public politics from categorical inequality, and suppression of autonomous coercive power centres as crucial processes. Through analytic narratives and comparisons of multiple regimes, mostly since World War II, this book makes the case for recasting current theories of democracy, democratization and de-democratization.
  

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Review: Democracy

User Review  - Sam Norton - Goodreads

Nothing particularly striking or new here, but nevertheless a relatively comprehensive look at democratization and de-democratization. Light on the science though, and somewhat anecdotal at times. Read full review

Review: Democracy

User Review  - Goodreads

Nothing particularly striking or new here, but nevertheless a relatively comprehensive look at democratization and de-democratization. Light on the science though, and somewhat anecdotal at times. Read full review

Contents

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Capacity
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BOX 31 Principles for Description of Democracy Democratization and
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Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 5 - Whereas every person in Malawi is entitled to the fundamental rights and freedoms of the individual, that is to say, the right, whatever his race, place of origin, political opinions, colour, creed or sex, but subject to respect for the rights and freedoms of others and for the public interest, to each and all of the following, namely : (a) life, liberty, security of the person and the protection of the law ; (b) freedom of conscience, of expression and of assembly and association ; and (c) protection...
Page 2 - Are the people free from domination by the military, foreign powers, totalitarian parties, religious hierarchies, economic oligarchies, or any other powerful group? 8. Do cultural, ethnic, religious, and other minority groups have reasonable self-determination, self-government, autonomy, or participation through informal consensus in the decision-making process?
Page 2 - Is the head of state and/or head of government or other chief authority elected through free and fair elections? 2. Are the legislative representatives elected through free and fair elections? 3. Are there fair electoral laws, equal campaigning opportunities, fair polling and honest tabulation of ballots?
Page 3 - Is there protection from political terror, unjustified imprisonment, exile, or torture, whether by groups that support or oppose the system? Is there freedom from war and insurgencies?
Page 2 - Do the people have the right to organize in different political parties or other competitive political groupings of their choice, and is the system open to the rise and fall of these competing parties or groupings?

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About the author (2007)

Charles Tilly (PhD Harvard, 1958) taught at the University of Delaware, Harvard University, the University of Toronto, the University of Michigan, and the New School for Social Research before becoming Joseph L. Buttenwieser Professor of Social Science at Columbia University. A member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, he has published fifty books and monographs. His recent books from Cambridge University Press include Dynamics of Contention (with Doug McAdam and Sidney Tarrow, 2001), Silence and Voice in the Study of Contentious Politics (with Ronald Aminzade and others, 2001), The Politics of Collective Violence (2003), Contention and Democracy in Europe, 1650–2000 (2004), and Trust and Rule (2005).