The Khasis (Google eBook)

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Macmillan, 1914 - Ethnology - 232 pages
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Page 78 - But among their neighbors, the closely related Khasis of the adjacent Khasi hills, after one or two children are born, and if a married couple get on well together the husband frequently removes his wife and family to a house of his own. While she lives in her mother's house, all her earnings (which are mainly derived from cultivation of the soil) are given to her mother, who expends them on the maintenance of the family.
Page 81 - ... all ancestral property is vested in the mother, it would be a mistake to suppose that the father is a nobody in the Khasi house. It is true that the kni...
Page xxii - The father has no kinship with his children, who belong to their mother's clan ; what he earns goes to his own matriarchal stock, and at his death his bones are deposited in the cromlech of his mother's kin. In Jowai he neither lives nor eats in his wife's house, but visits it only after dark (p.
Page xxi - In the first place, their social organisation presents one of the most perfect examples still surviving of matriarchal institutions, carried out with a logic and thoroughness which, to those accustomed to regard the status and authority of the father as the foundation of society, are exceedingly remarkable.
Page xxii - ... which, to those accustomed to regard the status and authority of the father as the foundation of society, are exceedingly remarkable. Not only is the mother the head and source, and only bond of union, of the family ; in the most primitive part of the hills, the Synteng country, she is the only owner of real property, and through her alone is inheritance transmitted. The father has no kinship with his children, who belong to their mother's clan ; what he earns goes in his own matriarchal stock,...
Page 81 - ... the father bears the heat and burden of the day, the maternal uncle only comes when it is a question of life or death.
Page 160 - ... armed with swords and cowries (fly-flaps). Having danced before the altar, the party returns to the house of the Siem priestess and executes another dance in the great courtyard. . . . Then follows a great dance of girls and men in front of her house . . . then there is the dance of the men. . . . After gyrating for some time two men at a time rapidly approach one another and clash their swords together in mock combat. . . . Dancing forms part of the ceremony of placing the ashes in the sepulchre...
Page xx - Khasis and certain peoples of Further India, the chief representatives of whom are the Mons or Talaings of Pegu and Tenasserim, the Khmers of Cambodia, and the majority of the inhabitants of Annam.
Page 92 - Taking up a position whence he is likely to be heard, he attracts attention to himself by a prolonged, unearthly yell, and then delivers himself of his errand : " KAW ! Thou, a fellow villager ! thou, a fellow creature ! thou, an old man ! thou, who art grown up ! thou, who art young ! thou, a boy ! thou, a child ! thou, an infant ! thou, who art great ! thou, who art little ! HEI ! in his own village, in his own place.
Page 100 - Men, who committed great havoc among men and animals. At last one man, bolder than his fellows, took with him a herd of goats and set himself down by the cave and offered them one by one to the thlen. By degrees the monster became friendly and learnt to open his mouth at a word from the man to receive the lump of flesh which was then thrown in. When confidence was thoroughly established, the man, acting under the advice of a god called...

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