Poems (Google eBook)

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author, 1756 - 236 pages
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Page 237 - Lo, the poor Indian! whose untutor'd mind Sees God in clouds, or hears him in the wind; His soul, proud science never taught to stray Far as the solar walk, or milky way...
Page 35 - Nature's whole charms to him are lost, No more the woods their music boast ; No more the meads their vernal bloom, No more the gales their rich perfume : Impending mists deform the sky, And beauty withers in his eye. In hopes his terrors to...
Page 191 - THE AUTHOR'S PICTURE. While in my matchless graces wrapt I stand, And touch, each feature with a trembling hand ; Deign, lovely self ! with art and nature's pride, To mix -the colours, and the pencil guide. Self is the grand pursuit of half mankind ; How vast a crowd by self, like me, are blind!
Page 12 - And ftill is pregnant, tho' fhe ftill beftows. Here verdant paftures wide extended lie, And yield the grazing herd exuberant fupply. .Luxuriant waving in the wanton air, Here golden grain rewards the peafant's care : Her vines mature with frefh carnation glow, And heav'n above diffufes heav'n below.
Page 132 - Tis thine, alas ! eternal fcorn to prove, Nor feel one gleam of comfort warm thy heart. But, if my fair this cruel law impofe, Pleas'd, to her will I all my foul refign, To walk beneath the burden of my woes, Or fink in death, nor at my fate repine. Yet...
Page 13 - Primeval night refumes her gloomy reign. Then from their dens, impatient of delay, The favage monfters bend their fpeedy way, Howl thro' the fpaciouswafte, and chafe the frighted prey.
Page 82 - To funfhine we fly from too piercing an air : But love's ardent fever burns always the fame ; No winter can cool it, no fummer inflame. But fee the pale moon, all clouded, retires, The breezes grow cool, not STREPHON'S defires : I fly from the dangers of tempeft and wind, Yet nourifh the madnefs that preys on my mind; Ah, wretch! how can life be worthy thy care?
Page 198 - LAP-DOG. I NEVER bark'd when out of season ; I never bit without a reason ; I ne'er insulted weaker brother; Nor wrong'd by force nor fraud another: Though brutes are placed a rank below, Happy for man could he say so ! BLACKLOCK.
Page iii - Among thefc early effays of his genius, there was one which is infcrted in his works. It was compofed •when he was but twelve years old ; and has fomething very pretty in the turn of it ; and •very promifing, for one of fo tender an age.
Page 36 - Till ev'ry human pain and care, All that may be, and all that are, But falfe imagin'd ills appear, Beneath our hope, our grief, or fear. And, if I right invoke thy aid, By Thee be all my woes allay'd: With fcorn inftruft me to defy Impofing fear, and lawlefs joy ; To ftruggle thro...

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