Seamanship in the Age of Sail: An Account of the Shiphandling of the Sailing Man-of-war, 1600-1860, Based on Contemporary Sources

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Naval Institute Press, 1984 - History - 320 pages
7 Reviews
Explains exactly how ninteenth-century sailing ships were controlled and discusses rigging, sails, steering, tacking, storms, and emergency procedures
  

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Review: Seamanship in the Age of Sail: An Account of the Shiphandling of the Sailing Man-of-War 1600-1860, Based on Contemporary Sources

User Review  - R.Bruce Macdonald - Goodreads

The author has done a great job of bringing together traditional texts and their illustrations on traditional ship handling and has even modernized the language so that even a lubber can get a grasp of how ships are sailed properly. Read full review

Review: Seamanship in the Age of Sail: An Account of the Shiphandling of the Sailing Man-of-War 1600-1860, Based on Contemporary Sources

User Review  - Julian Stockwin - Goodreads

One of the several books I particularly recommend when asked which books people should read to learn more about the Age of Fighting Sail. A definitive guide as to how the ships of the Georgian Navy were actually sailed. Read full review

Contents

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
7
MASTS RIGGING AND SAILS
19
DEVELOPMENT OF
36
SAILS CONSIDERED
72
ORGANISATION OF CREW
91
MAKING AND SHORTENING
124
REEFING
137
STUDDINGSAILS
155
TACKING WEARING
181
WORKING SHIP IN A TIDEWAY
199
STORM
209
SQUALLS
221
THE SHIP AT ANCHOR
231
SHIFTING HEAVY WEIGHTS
280
MAN OVERBOARD
289
BIBLIOGRAPHY
313

STEERING
173

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About the author (1984)

Harland is a recognized British authority on the art of shiphandling in the Age of Sail.

Myers works in oils, acrylics, water colours, pastels and inks. He is a charter member and Fellow of the American Society of Marine Artists.

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