Tap Roots: The Early History of Tap Dancing

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McFarland, May 20, 2002 - Performing Arts - 283 pages
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Tracing the development of tap dancing from ancient India to the Broadway stage in 1903, when the word "Tap" was first used in publicity to describe this new American style of dance, this text separates the cultural, societal and historical events that influenced the development of Tap dancing. Section One covers primary influences such as Irish step dancing, English clog dancing and African dancing. Section Two covers theatrical influences (early theatrical developments, "Daddy" Rice, the Virginia Minstrels) and Section Three covers various other influences (Native American, German and Shaker). Also included are accounts of the people present at tap's inception and how various styles of dance were mixed to create a new art form.
  

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Tap roots: the early history of tap dancing

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Having conducted extensive research on the origins of tap, choreographer Knowles (American Acad. of Dramatic Arts, Los Angeles; The Tap Dance Dictionary) here discusses this art form in terms of ... Read full review

Contents

Irish Influences
7
English Influences
15
African Influences
22
Dance in the West Indies
27
Dance in New Orleans
34
Dance on the Plantation
38
Slave Religion and the Ring Shout
55
Dispersion of AfricanAmerican Dances
63
Other Forms of Entertainment
127
Vaudeville
135
English Music Hall
150
Women on the Stage
156
OTHER INFLUENCES
165
Indian Gypsy and Spanish Influences
167
German and Shaker Influences
174
Native American Influences
182

THEATRICAL INFLUENCES
71
Early Theatrical Developments
73
Daddy Rice
78
The King of Diamonds and Master Juba
86
The Virginia Minstrels
93
The Development of the Minstrel Show
100
Black Minstrelsy and Musical Theatre
117
American Country Dance
190
Conclusions
200
Notes
211
Bibliography
249
Index
259
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Mark Knowles, choreographer of more than 300 theatrical productions, is on the faculty of the American Academy of Dramatic Arts in Los Angeles, California.

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