The Internet: An Ethnographic Approach

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Bloomsbury Academic, Jun 1, 2000 - Computers - 224 pages
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An examination of Internet culture and consumption. The Internet is increasingly shaping, and being shaped by, users' lives. From cybercafes to businesses, from middle class houses to squatters settlements, the authors have gathered material on subjects as varied as personal relations, commerce, sex and religion. Websites are also analyzed as new cultural formations acting as aesthetic traps. At every point, email chat and surfing are found to be exploited in ways that bring out both unforeseen attributes of the Internet and the contradictions of modern life. The material, taken from ethnographic work in Trinidad, adds depth to earlier discussions about the Internet as an expansion of space, the changes it effects to time and personhood, and the new political economy of the information age. A tie-in with the book's own website provides further illustrations.

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Contents

Trinidad and the Internet An Overview
27
Relationships
55
Being Trini and Representing Trinidad
85
Copyright

5 other sections not shown

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Chris Atton
Limited preview - 2002
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About the author (2000)

Daniel Miller is Professor of Anthropology at the University College London. Recent books include 'A Theory of Shopping' and 'Car Cultures'.



Don Slater is Reader in Sociology at the London School of Economics.

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