Journalism as a profession (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Hodder & Stoughton, 1903 - 109 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 35 - Cabinet Secrets," (How they are Revealed), " English as 'tis Writ," " Curiosities of Journalism," " Scottish Humour," " New Woman Freaks," and so on, and so on. The bulky envelopes I shall presently empty of their contents and weld these into articles ; the thin ones grow stouter day by day, and new ones are constantly being added, so that for this kind of article (for which there is an inexhaustible demand) there is an unlimited supply of material. It will be said, no doubt, that this is not very...
Page 34 - Man. 3 a surprising adventure, or in another corner there may be a witty story of some eminent person. These are all as valuable to me as bricks to a bricklayer. My blue pencil ticks them off at once; later on they are cut out by a pair of humble, necessary scissors, and then they are placed in envelopes bearing the names of the subjects they have suggested. Thus I turn to my pigeon-holes at this moment and find a large bundle of envelopes, some full of clippings, like ripe peapods, and others as...
Page 33 - I have come to appreciate the value of jnethojl, and to this, as much as any other quality, any advance I have made is due. As a general rule I will have twenty or thirty articles of a certain kind on the stocks at one time ; and this is how I go about it. Having, in the daily discharge of my editorial duties, to peruse a large number of newspapers, I have accustomed my eye to catch all the little oddities of daily life reflected therein. Here will be a paragraph about an amusing police-court case,...
Page 34 - Stories of the Queen,' ' Hairbreadth Escapes,' ' Cabinet Secrets ' (how they are revealed), ' English as 'tis Writ,' ' Curiosities of Journalism,' ' Scottish Humour,' ' New "Woman Freaks,' and so on, and so on. The bulky envelopes I shall presently empty of their contents and weld ' these into articles ; the thin ones grow stouter day by day, and new ones are constantly being added, so that for this kind of article (for which there is an inexhaustible demand) there is an unlimited supply of material.
Page 81 - They never happened ; and a mere report of them, which if they had really happened would be of enthralling interest, is the dullest of all dull reading. What is it, then, that has happened in a theatre ? A certain number of people have gathered together, and by the various means that compose the art of the dramatist, the actor, the scene-painter, and the musician, have been moved to the emotions of joy, or hope, or sorrow, or mirth, and possibly have received at the same time some intellectual enlightenment.
Page 82 - ... in effect, tell, not the story of the play, but a parallel story of his own, true to the story of the play but enormously concentrated and simplified in incident, and also very much altered in emphasis, for it is generally just those matters which seem most important and exciting on the stage which are least suggestive on paper. He has, by this story of his, to...
Page 85 - Society may have come into existence in order to respond to an urgent need to redefine the language of criticism and to address such issues as the difference between a 'dramatic' critic and a 'theatre' critic and whether indeed the critic was 'engaged in one of the most difficult and necessary tasks that the varied labours of daily journalism can afford...
Page 189 - a certain number of fools were let in at 8 10s. each." I was one of the fools, and still hold the shares, but, in addition to the depreciation in their value, I have never received a dividend, and have been overwhelmed with abuse in Parliament and elsewhere. And quite rightly, I think. It never occurred to me when I purchased...
Page 191 - JA SPENDER, and many -others, including many of the Progressive Members in the House of Commons. THE NEW LIBERAL REVIEW was the medium used by DR. CLIFFORD for his reply to Mr. Balfour's attack, and so...
Page 184 - It is part of the business of a newspaper to get news and to print it; it is part of the business of a politician to prevent certain news being printed. For this reason the politician often takes a newspaper into his confidence for the mere purpose of preventing the publication of the news he deems objectionable to his interests.

Bibliographic information