Words and Music: A History of Pop in the Shape of a City

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University of Georgia Press, 2005 - Music - 360 pages
15 Reviews
Has pop burnt itself out?

Paul Morley takes the reader on an epic drive through the history of music to find out. A succession of celebrities, geniuses and other protagonists led by Madonna, Kraftwerk, Brian Eno, Erik Satie, John Cage and Wittgenstein appear to give their points of view. Detours and sights along the way include Missy Elliot, Jarvis Cocker, Eminem, Human League, Radiohead, Lou Reed, Now! That's What I Call Music, Ornette Coleman and the ghost of Elvis Presley.

  

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Review: Words and Music: A History of Pop in the Shape of a City

User Review  - Ron Mcfarlan - Goodreads

Maybe a bit much Minogue and too little Lucier. Still, damn near every time he made a list, I was familiar with at least 80% of the musicians, many of them obscure. I found it comforting that someone ... Read full review

Review: Words and Music: A History of Pop in the Shape of a City

User Review  - Per Westby - Goodreads

Heavy reading, imaginative writing Read full review

Contents

I
1
II
109
III
213
IV
275
V
350
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About the author (2005)

Paul Morley is a magazine and newspaper journalist, TV critic, TV presenter, TV producer and director, record producer, and formerly a musical artist with the group The Art of Noise. His books include Nothing, the acclaimed memoir, and Ask, a collection of his writings from the British pop music weekly NME (New Musical Express).

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