The Cambridge History of the Pacific Islanders

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Cambridge University Press, Mar 25, 2004 - History - 540 pages
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This history presents an authoritative and comprehensive introduction to the experiences of Pacific islanders from their first settlement of the islands to the present day. It addresses the question of insularity and explores islanders' experiences thematically, covering such topics as early settlement, contact with Europeans, colonialism, politics, commerce, nuclear testing, tradition, ideology, and the role of women. It incorporates material on the Maori, the Irianese in western New Guinea, the settled immigrant communities in Fiji, New Caledonia and the Hawaiian monarchy and follows migrants to New Zealand, Australia and North America.
  

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Contents

Contending Approaches
3
Boundaries
6
History and Ethnohistory
9
Indigenous Historical Genres
14
Colonial Histories
20
The Islandoriented Revisionists
24
Indigenous Postcolonial Historians
26
Decolonising Pacific History?
30
The Economics of Colonialism
264
Labour
270
The Politics of Colonialism
274
Health Education
278
The Native Mother
280
Conclusion
287
Bibliographic Essay
288
THE PACIFIC SINCE 1941
289

Introduction to Pacific Islands Bibliography
32
Human Settlement
37
Story of Latmikaik
39
Disciplines and Dates
40
The Pleistocene Pacific
41
Linguistic Evidence
50
Recent Prehistory The Holocene
52
Castaways
69
The People of the Sea
74
Bibliographic Essay
77
Pacific Edens? Myths and Realities of Primitive Affluences
80
Production
83
Land Tenure
90
Trade and Exchange
96
Gender Division of Labour
105
Lives and Deaths
113
Bibliographic Essay
118
Discovering Outsiders
119
Earliest Encounters
122
First Encounters in the Twentieth Century
136
Material Relations
140
Conclusions
145
Foreign Voyages
148
Bibliographic
150
Land Labour and Independent Development
152
Whales Bechedemer and Sandalwood
154
Settlers
159
The New Zealand Wars and the Maori King Movement
164
Visionaries and Entrepreneurs
172
Peasants and Plantations
175
Autonomous Development?
181
Bibliographic Essay
183
New Political Orders
185
Chiefly Ambitions and Foreign Meddling
187
Chiefs and Conversion
194
Words and The Word
200
The New Laws
205
Political Transformation and Resistance
209
Bibliographic Essay
216
New Economic Orders Land Labour and Dependency
218
Plantations and Plantation Workers
226
The Overthrow of the Hawaiian Monarchy
232
Mining Colonies
237
Depopulation
243
Land Labour and the States
249
Bibliographic Essay
252
Colonial Administration and the Invention of the Native
253
Ethnocentrism
260
The War in the Pacific
291
Evacuations
298
Islanders in the Armed Forces
300
Islanders and the New Foreigners
304
The Question of Loyalty
308
Islanders and the New Foreigners
311
Prophecy Deliverance and Subversion
316
Assessments
319
Bibliographic Essay
323
A Nuclear Pacific
324
Micronesia
326
Australia and Christmas Island
336
French Polynesia
338
The Idea of a Nuclearfree Pacific
355
Bibliographic Essay
357
The Material World Remade
359
The Transformed Material World
364
Redefining Resources
368
The Daily Worlds of Coral Islanders
374
The International Fishing Industry
376
Urbanisation and the Environment
381
Redefining Mineral Resources
383
Logging
389
Reconstructing and Managing the Environment
391
International Aid and International Conservation Organisations
394
Two Laws Together
395
Bibliographic Essay
396
The Ideological World Remade Cultures and Identities
397
Encapsulated Communities
400
Repression and Renaissance in Hawaii
403
Postcolonial Challenges
407
Coups in Fiji
415
The Civil War in Bougainville
419
Can Women Make a Difference?
421
Remaking Gender Ideologies?
424
Pacific Cultural Identities
428
Bibliographic Essay
437
The End of Insularity
439
Pacific Paradigms
441
Citizenship Identity and Essentialising Notions
446
Exiles and Assisted Migrants
451
Contemporary Voyaging
456
The Challenge
465
Bibliographic Essay
467
Glossary
468
Bibliography
471
Index
494
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About the author (2004)

Donald Denoon is Professor of Pacific Islands History in the Research School of Pacific Studies, Australian National University. His previous books include "Southern Africa Since 1800" (with Balam Nyeko, 1972 and 1984 ), "Settler Capitalism" (1981), "The Cambridge History of the Pacific Islanders" (Ed. 1997), and "Getting Under the Skin: the Bougainville Copper Agreement and the Creation of the Panguna Mine" (2000).

Dr Philippa Mein Smith teaches New Zealand and Australian history, and social history of medicine in the Department of History, University of Canterbury, New Zealand. Her previous publications include "Mothers and King Baby: Infant Survival and Welfare in an Imperial World: Australia 1880-1950" (1997).

Professor Denoon and Dr. Mein-Smith enjoyed the privilege of a month's fellowship at the Rockefeller Study Centre in Bellagio, to develop the text.

Dr Marivic Wyndham is an Australian cultural historian. Her doctoral thesis focused on the life and literature of the Australian novelist, Eleanor Dark (1901-1985). Her book, based on the thesis and due for release in mid-2001, offers a cross-cultural analysis of the writer. Dr Wyndham is now an Academic Adviser at the Study Skills Centre, Australian National University.

Stewart Firth is a visiting fellow in the department of international relations and is affiliated with the State, Society, and Governance in Melanesia Project at the research school of Pacific and Asian studies at the Australian National University.

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