Sketches of the domestic manners and institutions of the romans (Google eBook)

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Printed for Baldwin, Cradock, and Joy, 1821 - 347 pages
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Page 103 - The foes already have possess'd the wall : Troy nods from high, and totters to her fall. Enough is paid to Priam's royal name, More than enough to duty and to fame. If by a mortal hand my father's throne Could be defended, 'twas by mine alone.
Page 75 - Acanthus: this is surrounded by a walk enclosed with tonsile evergreens, shaped into a variety of forms. Beyond it is the Gestatio, laid out in the form of a circus, ornamented in the middle with box cut in numberless different figures, together with a plantation of shrubs, prevented by the shears from shooting up too high; the whole is fenced in by a wall covered by box, rising by different ranges to the top.
Page 178 - And antique vases, all of gold emboss'd (The gold itself inferior to the cost), Of curious work, where on the sides were seen The fights and figures of illustrious men, From their first founder to the present queen. The good ^Eneas, whose paternal care lulus...
Page 77 - ... which I use when I have none but intimate friends with me. A second portico looks upon this little area, and has the same prospect with the former I just now described.
Page 76 - ... box, rising by different ranges to the top. On the outside of the wall lies a meadow, that owes as many beauties to nature, as all I have been describing within does to art ; at the end of which are several other meadows and fields interspersed with thickets.
Page 236 - Eleven thousand are said to have been slain during four months of triumph in honour of a conquest over the Dacians ; and five hundred lions were killed in a few days, on another similar occasion. 9. The first public combats of gladiators took place at Rome in the close of the fifth century from the foundation of the city. They were exhibited at a funeral. From that period they became frequent on such occasions, and afterwards on days of public festival, were considered a material part of the ceremonies....
Page 81 - It is encompassed on every side with plane-trees covered with ivy, so that while their heads flourish with their own foliage, their bodies enjoy a borrowed verdure ; and thus the ivy, twining round the trunk and branches, spreads from tree to tree, and connects them together. Between each plane-tree are planted box-trees, and behind these, bay-trees, which blend their shade with that of the planes.
Page 82 - In one place you have a little meadow, in another the box is cut into a thousand different forms : sometimes into letters expressing the name of the master; sometimes that of the artificer; whilst here and there little obelisks rise, intermixed alternately with fruit-trees, when on a sudden, in the midst of this elegant regularity, you are surprised with an imitation of the negligent beauties of rural nature, in the centre of which lies a spot surrounded with a knot of dwarf plane-trees.
Page 64 - Whence come you, rogue?" he cries; "whose beans to-night Have stuffed you thus? what cobbler clubbed his mite, For leeks and sheep's-head porridge? Dumb! quite dumb! Speak, or be kicked. -Yet, once again! your home? Where shall I find you? At what beggar's stand (Temple, or bridge) whimp'ring with out-stretched hand?
Page 265 - Fair hair was the most esteemed, and both men and women used to stain it with a flaxen dye. Various essences were used to perfume and give it lustre, and, sometimes, it was powdered with gold dust to render it still more resplendent. This latter mode came from Asia : Josephus says, that it was practised by the Jews : some of the emperors adopted it ; and the hair of Commodus is said to have become so fair and bright by its constant use, that, when the sun shone upon it, his head appeared as if on...

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