The History and Legal Effect of Brevets in the Armies of Great Britain and the United States: From Their Origin in 1692 to the Present Time (Google eBook)

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D. Van Nostrand, 1877 - 576 pages
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Page 19 - And you are to observe and follow such Orders and Directions from Time to Time, as you shall receive from this or a future Congress...
Page 17 - States, or any other your Superior Officer, according to the rules and discipline of war, in pursuance of the trust reposed in you.
Page 17 - Captain and you are also to observe and follow such Orders and Directions as you shall from time to time receive from...
Page 120 - If, upon marches, guards, or in quarters, different corps of the Army happen to join or do duty together, the officer...
Page 127 - Treaty shall take effect, and be obligatory on the contracting parties, as soon as the same shall be ratified by the President, by and with the consent and advice of the Senate of the United States.
Page 53 - That General Washington shall be, and he is hereby, vested with full, ample, and complete powers to raise and collect together, in the most speedy and effectual manner, from any or all of these United States, sixteen battalions of infantry, in addition to those already voted by Congress...
Page 199 - An act for establishing rules and articles for the government of the armies of the United States,
Page 53 - ... he may want for the use of the army, if the inhabitants will not sell it, allowing a reasonable price for the same ; to arrest and confine persons who refuse to take the Continental currency, or are otherwise disaffected to the American cause; and return to the States, of which they are citizens, their names, and the nature of their offences, together with the witnesses to prove them. " That the foregoing powers be vested in General Washington, for and during the term of six months from the date...
Page 53 - American army ; to take, wherever he may be, whatever he may want for the use of the army, if the inhabitants will not sell it, allowing a reasonable price for the same ; to arrest and confine persons who refuse to take the Continental currency, or are otherwise disaffected to the American cause...
Page 18 - This commission to continue in force during the pleasure of the President of the United States, for the time being.

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