Words that Matter: Linguistic Perception in Renaissance English

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Stanford University Press, 1996 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 338 pages
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The grammar and rhetoric of Tudor and Stuart England prioritized words and word-like figures rather than sentences, a prioritizing that had significant consequences for linguistic representation. Examining a wide range of historical sources--treatises, grammars, poems, plays, rhetorics, logics, dictionaries, and sermons--the author investigates how words matter as currency or memento, graphic symbol or template, icon or topos.
  

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Contents

Latin and Lexicons
43
The Definitive Word
71
Stones Well Squared
101
Magic and Metaphor
137
Weighing Words
167
Notes
235
Works Cited
301
31
331
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About the author (1996)

Judith H. Anderson is Professor of English at Indiana University. She is the author of Biographical Truth: The Representation of Historical Persons in Tudor-Stuart England and The Growth of a Personal Voice: ?Piers Plowman” and ?The Faerie Queene.”

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