Two on a Tower

Front Cover
Penguin, Jul 1, 2000 - Fiction - 336 pages
62 Reviews
Lady Constantine breaks all the rules of social decorum when she falls in love with the beautiful youth Swithin St Cleeve, her social inferior and ten years her junior. The tower in question is a monument converted into an astronomical observatory where together the lovers 'sweep the heavens'. Science and romance are destined to collide, however, as work, ambition and the pressures of the outside world intrude upon the pair. In what Sally Shuttleworth calls 'a drama of oppositions and conflicts', Hardy's story sets male desire against female constancy, and 'describes an arc across the horizon of late nineteenth-century social and cultural concerns: sexuality, class, history, science and religion'.


  

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I need a happy ending sometime soon. - Goodreads
And the ending was annoying, as if the author could - Goodreads
And it gives a wonderful insight into astronomy fro - Goodreads

Review: Two on a Tower

User Review  - Sarah - Goodreads

I was really looking forward to reading this as I haven't read any Thomas Hardy for a while, but it was a real disappointment. The set-up is fantastic; a love story set against the background of ... Read full review

Review: Two on a Tower

User Review  - Nick Turner - Goodreads

Not Hardy's finest moment. A bit of a silly story and frankly a bit melodramatic. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
GENERAL EDITORS PREFACE
HARDYS LIFE AND WORKS
BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTE
INTRODUCTION
FURTHER READING
A HISTORY OF THE TEXT
VOLUME I
CHAPTER XIII
CHAPTER XIV
CHAPTER XV
VOLUME III
CHAPTER II
CHAPTER III
CHAPTER IV
CHAPTER V

VOLUME II
CHAPTER II
CHAPTER III
CHAPTER IV
CHAPTER V
CHAPTER VI
CHAPTER VII
CHAPTER VIII
CHAPTER IX
CHAPTER X
CHAPTER XI
CHAPTER XII
CHAPTER VI
CHAPTER VII
CHAPTER VIII
CHAPTER IX
CHAPTER X
CHAPTER XI
CHAPTER XII
NOTES
APPENDIXPreface 1895
GLOSSARY
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Thomas Hardy was born on June 2, 1840. In his writing, he immortalized the site of his birth—Egdon Heath, in Dorset, near Dorchester. Delicate as a child, he was taught at home by his mother before he attended grammar school. At sixteen, Hardy was apprenticed to an architect, and for many years, architecture was his profession; in his spare time, he pursued his first and last literary love, poetry. Finally convinced that he could earn his living as an author, he retired from architecture, married, and devoted himself to writing. An extremely productive novelist, Hardy published an important book every year or two. In 1896, disturbed by the public outcry over the unconventional subjects of his two greatest novels—Tess of the D’Urbervilles and Jude the Obscure—he announced that he was giving up fiction and afterward produced only poetry. In later years, he received many honors. He died on January 11, 1928, and was buried in Poet’s Corner, in Westminster Abbey. It was as a poet that he wished to be remembered, but today critics regard his novels as his most memorable contribution to English literature for their psychological insight, decisive delineation of character, and profound presentation of tragedy.

Bibliographic information