Biographical History of North Carolina from Colonial Times to the Present, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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C. L. Van Noppen, 1905 - North Carolina
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Page 141 - And he gave it for his opinion, that whoever could make two ears of corn, or two blades of grass, to grow upon a spot of ground where only one grew before, would deserve better of mankind, and do more essential service to his country, than the whole race of politicians put together.
Page 182 - Solon compared the people unto the sea, and orators and counsellors to the winds : for that the sea would be calm and quiet, if the winds did not trouble it.
Page 160 - Resolved, That the delegates for this colony in the Continental Congress be impowered to concur with the delegates of the other colonies in declaring independency, and forming foreign alliances...
Page 472 - Men, my brothers, men the workers, ever reaping something new: That which they have done but earnest of the things that they shall do.
Page 307 - These were William R. Davie and Alfred Moore. Each of them had endeared himself to his country by taking an active part in the latter scenes of the war; and when public order was restored and the courts of justice were opened, they appeared at the bar where they quickly rose to eminence, and for many years shone like meteors in North-Carolina.
Page 255 - It is to our common schools, in which every child can receive the rudiments of an education, that our attention should be mainly directed." His opponent for his second term was Louis D. Henry. Owing to the untimely death of President Harrison and the alleged defection of Mr. Tyler, the Whig party in North Carolina was apathetic and almost disorganized; but Governor Morehead's majority, though reduced, was about five thousand. In his last official message, delivered in 1845, he made the following...
Page 219 - Journal of a thousand miles travel." This part is not used by Brickell. The edition of his work published in 1737 contains 408 pages, of about 340 words to the page. Brickell took the book of Lawson, reworked it in his own fashion, extended or curtailed, and brought it down to his time. The effect of his professional training is seen everywhere, for there is hardly a description of a plant or animal which does not have some medical use attached to it. His work is fuller, more systematic, and seems...
Page 47 - It was the boast of Augustus that he found Rome of brick and left it of marble. How much nobler will be the sovereign's boast when he shall have to say that he found law dear and left it cheap ; found it a sealed book and left it a living letter ; found it the patrimony of the rich, left it the inheritance of the poor ; found it a two-edged sword of craft and oppression, left it the staff of honesty and the shield of innocence...
Page 47 - Sovereign's boast when he shall have it to say, that he found Law dear, and left it cheap ; found it a sealed book, and left it a living letter ; found it the patrimony of the rich, left it the inheritance of the poor ; found it the two-edged sword of craft and oppression, left it the staff of honesty and the shield of innocence.
Page 258 - Gray, John L. Morehead, Major J. Turner Morehead, and Eugene L. Morehead. Governor Morehead's life spanned a period of the nineteenth century marked by unparalleled economic change and industrial enterprise. Between the years 1830 and 1845 railroads were first built, telegraph lines were first stretched, and the ocean was crossed for the first time by steam propelled vessels.

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