Aethiopian adventures: or, The history of Theagenes and Chariclea (Google eBook)

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Reprinted [by R. and A. Foulis] in the year, 1753 - Biography & Autobiography - 309 pages
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Page 199 - ... spectators. While he was thus speaking, the dead person made answer, with a hollow and dreadful tone : " At first I spared you, mother," said he, " and suffered your transgressing against human nature and the laws of destiny, and by charms and witchcraft disturbing those things which should rest inviolated : for even the dead retain a reverence towards their parents, as much as is possible for them ; but since you exceed all bounds, being not content with the wicked action you began, nor satisfied...
Page 200 - ... acquainting them with the affairs and fortunes of the dead. One of them is a priest, which makes it more tolerable ; who knows, by his wisdom, that such things are not to be divulged; — a person dear to the Gods, who shall with his arrival prevent the duel of his sons prepared for combat, and compose their difference. But that which is more grievous is, that a virgin has been spectator of all that has been done, and heard what was said : a virgin and lover, that has wandered through countries...
Page 199 - ... body of her son, whispering in his ear, she awakened him, and by the force of her charms, made him to stand upright. Chariclea, who had hitherto looked on with sufficient fear, was now astonished ; wherefore she waked Calasiris to be likewise spectator of what was done. They stood unseen themselves, but plainly beheld, by the light of the moon and fire, where the business was performed ; and by reason of the little distance, heard the discourse, the Beldam now bespeaking her son in a louder voice....
Page 198 - Then taking a piece of dough, formed into the likeness of a man, crowned with laurel and bdellium, she cast it into the pit. After this, snatching a sword that lay in the field, with more than Bacchanal fury (addressing herself to the moon in many strange terms) she launched her arm, and with a branch of laurel bedewed with her blood, she besprinkled the fire : with many other prodigious ceremonies. Then bowing herself to the body of her son, whispering in his ear, she awakened him, and by the force...
Page 1 - THE break of day had now difperfed the darknefs, and the fun with earlieft beams, gilded the fummits of the mountains; when a troop of men that had no living but by robberies, and rapine, appeared upon the Promontory that elevates...
Page 182 - Nil us, they perceived a crocodile labour* ing to fwim from the one more to the other, but the fwift current and wild waves ftill broke his force, and often duckt him to the bottom of the river.
Page 92 - Knemon, that the foul is a divine thing, and allied to the Superior Nature, we know by its operations and...

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