Tao Te Ching: A Book about the Way and the Power of the Way

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Shambhala, 1997 - Philosophy - 125 pages
40 Reviews
This is a completely fresh and poetic version of the twenty-five-hundred-year-old Chinese spiritual classic, by one of America's most thought-provoking writers. Moved by a lifelong love for the Tao Te Ching, the novelist and poet Ursula K. Le Guin has been working on this version of the text since the 1950s. Scholar J. P. Seaton has added expert linguistic guidance to her work, bringing to it an equally passionate commitment to scholarly accuracy. Together they have created a translation that is unlike any seen before. Le Guin's version captures all the brilliance of Lao Tzu's poetry while conveying with immediacy and clarity the astonishing depth of his spiritual insights. It also corrects many of the distorted views of Lao Tzu's philosophy, freeing it from gender-bias and revealing its universal relevance. This new version is sure to be welcomed by the many readers of the Tao Te Ching, as well as those coming to the text for the first time.

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Review: Lao Tzu : Tao Te Ching : A Book About the Way and the Power of the Way

User Review  - Piggie - Goodreads

So, I read this from beginning to end over the night. It is one of those books that is easily and quickly read. Yet, it is the kind of material that is thought provoking enough to take a life time to ... Read full review

Review: Lao Tzu: Tao Te Ching

User Review  - Lauren - Goodreads

Really good read. Definitely will require multiple read-throughs to let each chapter sink in, though. This is the only version of the Tao Te Ching I've ever read, so I don't have others to compare it ... Read full review

About the author (1997)

Edmund Ryden teaches at Fujen University in Taiwan. He was the first director of the John Paul II Peace Institute at Fujen University and also teaches human rights at Soochow University.

Arguably one of the canonical writers of American science fiction, Ursula K. Le Guin was born in Berkeley, Calif., in 1929, the daughter of Alfred L. and Theodora Kroeber. After earning an A.B. degree from Radcliffe College and an A.M. from Columbia University, Le Guin was awarded a Fulbright fellowship in 1953. The genre formerly classified as 'science fiction' has become divided into sub-genres, such as fantasy, realistic fiction, alternative history, and other categories. Le Guin resists classifying her own work in any one area, saying that some of it may be called 'science fiction', while other writings may be considered 'realist' and still others 'magical realism' (her term). Le Guin is one of the few writers whose works (which include poetry and short fiction) can be found in public libraries' collections for children, young adults, and adults. Le Guin's published works include a novel, A Wizard of Earthsea, that won an American Library Association Notable Book citation, a Horn Book Honor List citation, and the Lewis Carroll Shelf Award in 1979. She has been nominated several times for the Nebula Award and the Hugo Award--the highest honors in science fiction/fantasy writing--and has won both awards. Her Earthsea Trilogy is a mainstay of libraries' fantasy fiction collections. Le Guin married Charles Alfred Le Guin on December 22, 1953. They live in Portland, Ore.

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